Father’s Day is on Sunday, and I’m guessing that many of you learned to love the Reds at your father’s knee. For years and years, baseball has thrived on generation after generation handing their love for this club to their children. If your dad is like ours, I’m guessing he’d appreciate receiving “The Big 50: […]

As you surely know, if you are one of the loyal citizens of Redleg Nation who are here every single day, obsessing over the Cincinnati Reds, fellow RN writer Chris Garber and I wrote a book about the Reds. It’s really a loving tribute to the history of this organization — our publisher, Triumph Books, […]

So, this wasn’t a very good weekend for the ol’ Redlegs. The Cincinnati Reds were swept by the Washington Nationals (check out Nick’s recap of the final game of the series), and the three-game set was filled with questionable decisions by manager Bryan Price, awful pitching from the bullpen, and more of the same from […]

Jackson Stephens’ major league debut wasn’t brilliant, but it was memorable. And it brought back memories for me and other Reds fans. Jackson got the win against the Cubs, thanks to his two-run single, a presence on the mound, eight strikeouts and some great pitching from the bullpen. The fact that it came against Chicago […]

Since it’s the off-season and we can’t spend every day writing about why Raisel Iglesias needs to be a starter next season, I thought it would be an appropriate time to embark upon a project that I’ve been wanting to explore for years. That is, I thought it would be fun to look at the […]

I love the Cincinnati Reds. I shouldn’t actually have to say that, since I’ve been writing about the Reds — and demonstrating my obsession with this infernal team — nearly every single day here at Redleg Nation for the last nine seasons. But make no mistake: I love the Cincinnati Reds National League Baseball Club, […]

We all have our favorites. Ask any Reds fan about their favorite player, and you’ll get a bunch of different answers, for a bunch of different reasons. Here at the Nation, I’ve written about my favorite current Reds a number of times. At the top of that list is probably Bronson Arroyo, because it’s just […]

May 31–The 1981 season may have been one of the most disappointing seasons in Reds history. Not because of their play on the field; to the contrary, the Reds had baseball’s best record, 66-42, but were left out of the playoffs due to the “split-season” format necessitated by the player strike. The Reds finished second in both the first half and second half and were left out of the post-season championship run.

With free agency still being somewhat new, and the Reds not wanting to participate, they made several off-season moves post-1981. CF Ken Griffey Sr. was traded to the Yankees; LF George Foster was traded to the Mets; RF Dave Collins was granted free agency; 3B Ray Knight was traded to the Astros; C Joe Nolan was traded to the Orioles. SP Paul Moskau was traded to the Orioles in a separate deal, and RP Doug Bair was traded to the Cardinals. In return, we received an aging Cesar Cedeno, 3B Wayne Krenchicki, failed OF prospect Clint Hurdle, C Alex Trevino, RP Jim Kern, and two swing men, Bob Shirley and Greg Harris.
Continue reading

Two last inning home runs by Wayne Krenchicki and Brad Gulden, in the bottoms of the ninth and 14th innings, respectively, save the Reds from a near loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates, 6-4, on May 30, 1984. After spotting the Pirates a 3-0 lead, the Reds had rallied for two runs in the bottom of […]

July 23, 1985: Jeff Russell is sent by the Cincinnati Reds to the Texas Rangers to complete an earlier deal made on July 19, 1985. The Cincinnati Reds sent a player to be named later and Duane Walker to the Texas Rangers for a player to be named later and Buddy Bell. The Cincinnati Reds sent Jeff Russell (July 23, 1985) to the Texas Rangers to complete the trade.

1982 was one of the worst years in Reds’ history with the team losing 101 games. The team replaced John McNamara as manager during the 1982 season and replaced him with Russ Nixon, and the team improved to 74 games in the win column for 1983. Not satisfied with the results, Nixon was fired and the Reds hired Vern Rapp, who didn’t make it through the season. The Reds traded for Pete Rose, who was named player-manager, and the Reds finished with 70 wins. Under Rose’s direction, the team spiked and jumped to win totals of 89, 86, 84, and 87, finished second over the next four seasons before scandal brought down the team’s manager and the team.

Continue reading

While visiting my in-laws in western Kentucky over Mother’s Day weekend, I happened to see twice-former Red 3b Wayne Krenchicki being interviewed on an Evansville, IN, television station. Krenchicki is now the manager of the Evansville Otters, an independent team in the Frontier League. My oldest’s son’s first private hitting instructor used to catch for […]