Today in Cincinnati Reds history… 1970: The Reds acquired Bill Harrelson and Dan Loomer from the Angels in exchange for Jack Fisher. I’m not sure why I’m even wasting your time by mentioning this deal, except that none of the players ever played in the majors again after this trade. Fisher had gone 5-5 with […]

All the speculation on whether Bryan Price would return to the Reds as their manager has now concluded. He will be back next year for sure, with an option year included. To most involved with Redleg Nation, we see that as eminently fair. Price hasn’t had the benefit of really playing with a full deck […]

Before the 1961 season started, Reds General Manager Bill DeWitt made a trade and acquired a third baseman by the name of Gene Freese. He acquired Freese from the Chicago White Sox for Cal McLish and Juan Pizzaro. This one was a steal. DeWitt’s trade was a big part in the Reds success that year. […]

First, the truth. When Nation editor Steve Mancuso asked for a quick 100-word prediction of the 2016 Cincinnati Reds, I almost wrote: “I hope these Reds aren’t as bad as the team in 1982.” The train wreck in 1982 resulted in a record of 61-101. The Engineer of that debacle was General Manager Dick Wagner. […]

  We asked the writing staff to offer up to 100 words in answer to the question: What would you consider a successful season for the 2016 Cincinnati Reds? They were told they could frame their answers in terms of wins and losses or otherwise. Please add your own answers in the comments section. Here’s […]

[This post was written by John Ring, who is the Nation’s correspondent from Afghanistan, where he is serving the entire nation.] It’s all quiet —- some would say too quiet -— on the Reds front. No news on Arroyo. Choo is gone. No trades. Nothing. So while we collectively ponder the state of the current […]

Let’s recap today’s titanic struggle…. FINAL Cincinnati 5 Milwaukee 6 W: J. Henderson (4-5) L: Z. Duke (1-2) BOX SCORE POSITIVES –Todd Frazier was 2-4 with a homer and two RBI. Jay Bruce and Joey Votto were each 2-4 with a walk; Bruce scored two runs and Votto drove in one. As noted below, Bruce […]

2013 is looking good so far. Despite injuries to their #1 starter, starting leftfielder and cleanup hitter and catcher, the Reds are thick in the race for the Division as Memorial Day awaits. Their MVP is a Boy Named Choo, Votto is hitting like Votto and Bruce looks like he is in the beginning of […]

Over at Grantland, Jonah Keri has a pretty good piece on the Todd Frazier dilemma that will be staring the Reds in the face when Joey Votto returns (this weekend, hopefully). I’ve gone on the record as urging people not to worry; there will be plenty of ABs to go around, with Frazier playing all […]

The Cincinnati Reds went 100 years without a team captain. That streak ended in 1970 when manager Sparky Anderson named Pete Rose the first captain of the Cincinnati Reds. Rose was an obvious choice. He was a native Cincinnatian, having played baseball (and football) at Western Hills High School. By the start of the 1970 […]

Let’s recap tonight’s titanic struggle…. FINAL Cincinnati 4 Washington 6 W: C. Wang (2-2) L: M. Leake (10-8) S: D. Storen (32) BOX SCORE POSITIVES –Jose Arredondo and Bill Bray pitched well out of the pen. Yonder Alonso had two hits and no errors. Jay Bruce had two RBI. Joey Votto scored two runs. NEGATIVES […]

October 30, 1992: Two weeks after becoming the youngest General Manager in baseball history (at the time), Jim Bowden pulls off a public relations coups by naming Tony Perez manager of the Reds.

Lou Piniella had resigned as Reds manager on October 6 to become manager of the Seattle Mariners. Piniella had won the 1990 World Series in his first season as Reds manager, having replaced Tommy Helms, who had replaced the banned Pete Rose on August 24, 1989. Piniella had helped the Reds erase the public humiliation of Rose and the Reds with the 1990 wire-to-wire Reds championship. An injury-riddled 1991 led to a 74 win season in 1991, but the Reds rebounded to win 92 games in 1972, finishing in second place, eight games behind the Atlanta Braves. However, Piniella had grown weary of the Reds/Marge Schott circus and took his popular management style to Seattle where he stayed 10 years, including winning 116 games for the 2001 Mariners.

Two days after Piniella resigned from the Reds, Schott fired Reds general manager Bob Quinn. and promoted Bowden eight days later. Despite being only 31, Bowden had worked in baseball front offices with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1984-88) and with the New York Yankees in 1989 before joining the Reds organization.

Hall of Famer Tony Perez was/is an all-time favorite of many Reds fans. Nicknamed “Big Doggie” the slugging first baseman was known for his clutch hitting, his 379 home runs, and his ability to keep balance in the Big Red Machine clubhouse. After being traded to the Montreal Expos before the 1977 season, Perez played for three teams besides the Reds for seven seasons before returning to Cincinnati as a free agent to play his final three seasons in a Reds uniform. He immediately became a coach and served on the staffs of Rose, Helms, and Piniella.

Having Perez available was an opportune moment for the Reds. From “Redleg Journal” by Greg Rhodes and John Snyder:

Many fans were upset about the resignation of Piniella, but the hiring of the popular Perez quickly rekindled enthusiasm. At the time, Marge Schott was under investigation by the commissioner’s office for her hiring practices and use of racial and ethnic slurs. While Perez was a highly-qualified candidate, cynics wondered if Perez was hired only to placate Major League Baseball.

No matter the reason, hiring Perez was like gold to the Reds fan base. However, like fool’s gold, the joy was short-lived. In February, 2003, MLB suspended Schott for one year from Reds day-to-day operations and fined her $25,000 for making racial and ethnic slurs. With a new management team in place and high expectations from everyone after the 1992 rebound year, the Reds lost nine of their first 11 games to start the season. They rebounded to cross .500 at 19-18 and then went on west coast road trip where they lost six of seven games dropping them to 20-24. Bowden called Perez and fired him over the phone. From “Redleg Journal:”

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