This week’s respondents are Nick Doran, Nick Carrington, the inimitable Mary Beth Ellis, and Chad Dotson. Our Daily Reds Obsession: Which particular Reds team was your favorite? Nick D: I was too young to remember the Big Red Machine days, so I will take the 1999 Reds team that won 96 games and missed the […]

Who will be the next Reds Rookie of the Year? Will it be Nick Senzel? Jesse Winker? Shed Long? No one knows for sure. Most Cincinnati Reds who have won that award went on to have pretty good careers. There was Frank Robinson (1956), Pete Rose (1963), Tommy Helms (1966), Johnny Bench (1968). Pat Zachry […]

Jason Linden joined me again this week, and we had a wide-ranging discussion about all things Cincinnati. The conversation begins with Adam Dunn’s recent election to the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, but most of the discussion is focused on the best case/worst case scenarios for various members of the 2018 Cincinnati Reds. The podcast […]

This week’s respondents are Matt Habel, Steve Mancuso, Jim Walker, Tom Mitsoff, and Chad Dotson. Our Daily Reds Obsession: Who is the best defensive player you’ve ever seen in a Reds uniform? Matt: Billy Hamilton is definitely an easy answer because I have never seen anyone consistently make the plays that he does, let alone […]

Daniel Matthews has contributed here at Redleg Nation a few times previously (here is his most recent contribution), and we’re always happy to have his perspective. Enjoy! No, it’s not our beloved Redlegs’ 2-1 defeat of the Oakland A’s in Game 4 of the 1990 World Series to complete the sweep. It’s the last two […]

This is the third installment in the enormously popular Top Ten series, wherein we name the top ten players at each position in Reds franchise history. Previous: Redleg Top Ten: The Best Catchers in Reds History Redleg Top Ten: The Best First Basemen in Reds History Today, we take a look at the all-time best […]

No, it’s not an off-day. That’s when we usually post the latest edition of NSRT, but with the way the Reds are playing these last couple of games, we kinda wish it were an off-day, right? I have a lot of dumb things on my mind, so let’s do this… –The Reds’ bullpen is not […]

Last week, Ken Griffey Jr. was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame with a record 99.3% of the vote. Griffey accumulated most of his Hall of Fame credentials in Seattle from 1989-1999. He was 1997 AL MVP, a 10-time All Star, hit 398 HR and was arguably on pace to break Hank Aaron’s career […]

December 18, 2001: The Reds deal Gold Glove second baseman Pokey Reese and lefty reliever Dennys Reyes to the Colorado Rockies for pitchers Gabe White and Luke Hudson. The very next day, on December 19, Reese is dealt by the Rockies to the Boston Red Sox for catcher Scott Hatteberg. Two days after that, on […]

The National League Gold Glove winners are to be announced today. Hopefully, there won’t be any disastrous shocks like yesterday when Derek Jeter was awarded his fifth Gold Glove. The folks at baseball-reference.com were so mortified they even had a disclaimer next to the announcement (since taken down). The disclaimer was something like “We can’t […]

November 10, 1932: Donie Bush is named manager of the Reds. Bush had previously managed the 1927-29 Pittsburgh Pirates to great success (246-178, one pennant) and the 1930-31 Chicago White Sox to no success at all (118-189, 7th and 8th place of eight teams)

With the Reds, I suppose Bush demonstrated that it takes talent to win. The Reds finished last with a 58-94 record, 33 games behind the champion New York Giants. It also demonstrates the power of age when it comes to talent. The 1933 Reds had five future Hall of Famers on the team,tied with the 1932 team as having the most at any time in club history. However, none were in their primes. 42-year-old Eppa Rixey was 6-3 with a 3.15 ERA in 16 games (12 starts). 33-year-old first baseman Jim Bottomley batted .250 with 13 homers (.706 OPS), 25-year-old catcher Ernie Lombardi batted .283 with four homers, and 27-year-old shortstop Leo Durocher was traded after 16 games. 30-year-old outfielder Chick Hafey had a good year, batting 303 with a .772 OPS (122 OPS+), but it was nowhere near his best slugging seasons.

This was the season that the oldest Red to ever play participated. 49-year-old Jack Quinn pitched his last season, pitching in 14 games covering 15 2/3 innings, going 0-1 with a 4.02 ERA. His last two games came after his 50th birthday. Quinn and Hall of Fame knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm are the only players with at least ten games in the season of their fiftieth birthday. Quinn was a spitballer who finished his career 247-218 with a 3.29 ERA in 756 games (443 starts). 1933 was Quinn’s only season with the Reds.

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I’ve been trying for a few months to get everyone to believe in this team. I know some of you have gotten sick of the “Believe” mantra. Heck, it’s gotten a bit tiresome to me, but I found that I was enjoying myself much more after I decided to relax, enjoy, and believe that this […]