November 10, 1932: Donie Bush is named manager of the Reds. Bush had previously managed the 1927-29 Pittsburgh Pirates to great success (246-178, one pennant) and the 1930-31 Chicago White Sox to no success at all (118-189, 7th and 8th place of eight teams)

With the Reds, I suppose Bush demonstrated that it takes talent to win. The Reds finished last with a 58-94 record, 33 games behind the champion New York Giants. It also demonstrates the power of age when it comes to talent. The 1933 Reds had five future Hall of Famers on the team,tied with the 1932 team as having the most at any time in club history. However, none were in their primes. 42-year-old Eppa Rixey was 6-3 with a 3.15 ERA in 16 games (12 starts). 33-year-old first baseman Jim Bottomley batted .250 with 13 homers (.706 OPS), 25-year-old catcher Ernie Lombardi batted .283 with four homers, and 27-year-old shortstop Leo Durocher was traded after 16 games. 30-year-old outfielder Chick Hafey had a good year, batting 303 with a .772 OPS (122 OPS+), but it was nowhere near his best slugging seasons.

This was the season that the oldest Red to ever play participated. 49-year-old Jack Quinn pitched his last season, pitching in 14 games covering 15 2/3 innings, going 0-1 with a 4.02 ERA. His last two games came after his 50th birthday. Quinn and Hall of Fame knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm are the only players with at least ten games in the season of their fiftieth birthday. Quinn was a spitballer who finished his career 247-218 with a 3.29 ERA in 756 games (443 starts). 1933 was Quinn’s only season with the Reds.

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October 28, 1996: The Cincinnati Reds acquire former all-star outfielder Ruben Sierra from the Detroit Tigers for two minor league prospects, pitcher Ben Bailey and outfielder Decomba Conner. The Reds were looking for some outfield help after the 1996 season. The Reds had finished first in the 1995 National League Central Division with a 85-59 […]