Whether I was reeling from the cumulative effects of a multi-season rebuild or because I was nonplussed by an offseason in which the Reds’ only notable acquisitions were thirty-something journeymen relievers, I nearly scrapped my annual spring training road trip this year. “I never go to Phoenix to see the Reds play the Diamondbacks during […]

I am the first person—and certainly the first woman– I’ve ever met who openly admits to being a terrible driver. Directionally, technically, mechanically:  I’m bad at all of it and I will tell you so. Just after I turned sixteen, the State of Ohio license examiner, who spent his entire professional life sitting next to […]

Every spring, even the most cynical fans allow for fleeting moments of optimism. After all, projections are based on past performance, and there’s always the possibility of multiple players having breakout seasons and carrying their teams to unexpected postseason glory. It happens nearly every year – prior to last season, for example, Baseball Prospectus guesstimated […]

The National Baseball Hall of Fame has been tinkering with their system, and now there is evidently something called the “Today’s Game Era” ballot. The Hall of Fame announced the ten names on that ballot, and two of them were of interest to Reds fans: Five former Major League players, three executives and two managers […]

As part of our discussion of the new low-scoring run environment across baseball, let’s take a look at rising fastball velocity and see what effect that may have. Aroldis Chapman has been thrilling Reds fans with his blazing fastball ever since he burst upon the scene in 2010. We all know he set the all-time […]

[This post was written by John Ring, who is the Nation’s correspondent from Afghanistan, where he is serving the entire nation.] It got to the point where the Reds had no choice. Dusty Baker had to go. It was bad enough the Reds limped to the finish line, losing their last five games to settle […]

Let’s recap today’s titanic struggle…. FINAL Seattle 3 Cincinnati 1 W: J. Saunders (7-8) L: B. Arroyo (7-7) S: T. Wilhelmsen (18) BOX SCORE POSITIVES –Chris Heisey had two doubles, and drove in Cincinnati’s only run. Todd Frazier had a double, and scored that run. –The bullpen trio of Alfredo Simon, Manny Parra, and Aroldis […]

2013 is looking good so far. Despite injuries to their #1 starter, starting leftfielder and cleanup hitter and catcher, the Reds are thick in the race for the Division as Memorial Day awaits. Their MVP is a Boy Named Choo, Votto is hitting like Votto and Bruce looks like he is in the beginning of […]

Over at SI, Tom Verducci has an entertaining article about our manager. It’s your must-read for today: At the age of 61, and back for his 18th try at managing a World Series winner, Cincinnati manager Dusty Baker, a guy who in the first place didn’t want anything to do with managing, has become one […]

November 3, 1934: The Cincinnati Reds purchase outfielder Ival Goodman and third baseman Lew Riggs from the St. Louis Cardinals. Both players had been caught up in the vast organizational talent that made up the St. Louis Cardinals organization during that time. Between 1926 and 1934, the Cardinals appeared in five World Series, winning three […]

October 30, 1992: Two weeks after becoming the youngest General Manager in baseball history (at the time), Jim Bowden pulls off a public relations coups by naming Tony Perez manager of the Reds.

Lou Piniella had resigned as Reds manager on October 6 to become manager of the Seattle Mariners. Piniella had won the 1990 World Series in his first season as Reds manager, having replaced Tommy Helms, who had replaced the banned Pete Rose on August 24, 1989. Piniella had helped the Reds erase the public humiliation of Rose and the Reds with the 1990 wire-to-wire Reds championship. An injury-riddled 1991 led to a 74 win season in 1991, but the Reds rebounded to win 92 games in 1972, finishing in second place, eight games behind the Atlanta Braves. However, Piniella had grown weary of the Reds/Marge Schott circus and took his popular management style to Seattle where he stayed 10 years, including winning 116 games for the 2001 Mariners.

Two days after Piniella resigned from the Reds, Schott fired Reds general manager Bob Quinn. and promoted Bowden eight days later. Despite being only 31, Bowden had worked in baseball front offices with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1984-88) and with the New York Yankees in 1989 before joining the Reds organization.

Hall of Famer Tony Perez was/is an all-time favorite of many Reds fans. Nicknamed “Big Doggie” the slugging first baseman was known for his clutch hitting, his 379 home runs, and his ability to keep balance in the Big Red Machine clubhouse. After being traded to the Montreal Expos before the 1977 season, Perez played for three teams besides the Reds for seven seasons before returning to Cincinnati as a free agent to play his final three seasons in a Reds uniform. He immediately became a coach and served on the staffs of Rose, Helms, and Piniella.

Having Perez available was an opportune moment for the Reds. From “Redleg Journal” by Greg Rhodes and John Snyder:

Many fans were upset about the resignation of Piniella, but the hiring of the popular Perez quickly rekindled enthusiasm. At the time, Marge Schott was under investigation by the commissioner’s office for her hiring practices and use of racial and ethnic slurs. While Perez was a highly-qualified candidate, cynics wondered if Perez was hired only to placate Major League Baseball.

No matter the reason, hiring Perez was like gold to the Reds fan base. However, like fool’s gold, the joy was short-lived. In February, 2003, MLB suspended Schott for one year from Reds day-to-day operations and fined her $25,000 for making racial and ethnic slurs. With a new management team in place and high expectations from everyone after the 1992 rebound year, the Reds lost nine of their first 11 games to start the season. They rebounded to cross .500 at 19-18 and then went on west coast road trip where they lost six of seven games dropping them to 20-24. Bowden called Perez and fired him over the phone. From “Redleg Journal:”

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October 16, 1975: Don Gullett allowed only five hits and Tony Perez broke an 0-15 slump with two home runs as the Reds took a three-games-to-two lead with a 6-2 victory over the Boston Red Sox in the 1975 World Series. The Red Sox scored first in the first inning when Denny Doyle tripled and […]