Who will be the next Reds Rookie of the Year? Will it be Nick Senzel? Jesse Winker? Shed Long? No one knows for sure. Most Cincinnati Reds who have won that award went on to have pretty good careers. There was Frank Robinson (1956), Pete Rose (1963), Tommy Helms (1966), Johnny Bench (1968). Pat Zachry […]

I recently came across an article discussing the makeup of the current Arizona Diamondbacks roster in terms of how each player was acquired. It is a curious exercise that provides some insight into the type of transactions that have most impacted a team, as well as the General Managers that have the most fingerprints on […]

Every spring, even the most cynical fans allow for fleeting moments of optimism. After all, projections are based on past performance, and there’s always the possibility of multiple players having breakout seasons and carrying their teams to unexpected postseason glory. It happens nearly every year – prior to last season, for example, Baseball Prospectus guesstimated […]

One week out from the July 31 trade deadline, the Reds have yet to make a deal. That should change soon. Reports have circulated that the club is in trade discussions with several teams regarding Johnny Cueto and Mike Leake, players who will leave the Reds at the end of this season. They offer little remaining […]

[This post was written by John Ring, who is the Nation’s correspondent from Afghanistan, where he is serving the entire nation.] It was pretty much inevitable in the crazy economics of baseball that Bronson Arroyo wasn’t going to retire as a Cincinnati Red. When he recently signed a two-year contract with Arizona, that became a […]

Any venture capitalists out there? Somebody with some spare cash burning a hole in his pocket? Hey. Charlie Sheen’s a huge baseball guy and a serious Cincinnati Reds fan. He’s got wads of cash to invest in a project that would surely be a big hit with the young up-and-coming sabermetric minds currently upsetting the apple cart in traditional […]

The trade deadline rapidly approaches, and I expect the rumor mill to start spitting out nonsense at any moment. The Reds could use some help in a couple of areas, and we’re already hearing that they’ll look for relievers (again), but get ready for the silly season. That’s not why I’m gathering you here today, […]

John Fay reported a few minutes ago that the Reds are saying a trade isn’t imminent. “We’re not really close on anything,” Reds general manager Walt Jocketty said. Jocketty said something similar on December 14, 2011: “But we’re still not close on anything. It’s very frustrating.” Then two days later, this happened. Within a week, so did this. […]

November 20, 1992: The Reds release outfielder Geronimo Berroa. Berroa goes on to bat .288 with 97 home runs and 349 rbi between 1994 and 1997 from ages 29-32. Berroa’s release wasn’t big news at the time, but he was a talented player who apparently had defensive challenges. He was signed as a free agent […]

November 16, 2000: In cost cutting moves, the Reds deal away popular semi-regulars catcher Eddie Taubensee and IF-OF Chris Stynes. The 1999 and 2000 Reds were some of General Manager Jim Bowden’s busiest transaction years. Trying to balance the team’s budget around the salaries of stars such as Barry Larkin ($5.3 million), Dante Bichette ($7 […]

November 3, 1934: The Cincinnati Reds purchase outfielder Ival Goodman and third baseman Lew Riggs from the St. Louis Cardinals. Both players had been caught up in the vast organizational talent that made up the St. Louis Cardinals organization during that time. Between 1926 and 1934, the Cardinals appeared in five World Series, winning three […]

October 30, 1992: Two weeks after becoming the youngest General Manager in baseball history (at the time), Jim Bowden pulls off a public relations coups by naming Tony Perez manager of the Reds.

Lou Piniella had resigned as Reds manager on October 6 to become manager of the Seattle Mariners. Piniella had won the 1990 World Series in his first season as Reds manager, having replaced Tommy Helms, who had replaced the banned Pete Rose on August 24, 1989. Piniella had helped the Reds erase the public humiliation of Rose and the Reds with the 1990 wire-to-wire Reds championship. An injury-riddled 1991 led to a 74 win season in 1991, but the Reds rebounded to win 92 games in 1972, finishing in second place, eight games behind the Atlanta Braves. However, Piniella had grown weary of the Reds/Marge Schott circus and took his popular management style to Seattle where he stayed 10 years, including winning 116 games for the 2001 Mariners.

Two days after Piniella resigned from the Reds, Schott fired Reds general manager Bob Quinn. and promoted Bowden eight days later. Despite being only 31, Bowden had worked in baseball front offices with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1984-88) and with the New York Yankees in 1989 before joining the Reds organization.

Hall of Famer Tony Perez was/is an all-time favorite of many Reds fans. Nicknamed “Big Doggie” the slugging first baseman was known for his clutch hitting, his 379 home runs, and his ability to keep balance in the Big Red Machine clubhouse. After being traded to the Montreal Expos before the 1977 season, Perez played for three teams besides the Reds for seven seasons before returning to Cincinnati as a free agent to play his final three seasons in a Reds uniform. He immediately became a coach and served on the staffs of Rose, Helms, and Piniella.

Having Perez available was an opportune moment for the Reds. From “Redleg Journal” by Greg Rhodes and John Snyder:

Many fans were upset about the resignation of Piniella, but the hiring of the popular Perez quickly rekindled enthusiasm. At the time, Marge Schott was under investigation by the commissioner’s office for her hiring practices and use of racial and ethnic slurs. While Perez was a highly-qualified candidate, cynics wondered if Perez was hired only to placate Major League Baseball.

No matter the reason, hiring Perez was like gold to the Reds fan base. However, like fool’s gold, the joy was short-lived. In February, 2003, MLB suspended Schott for one year from Reds day-to-day operations and fined her $25,000 for making racial and ethnic slurs. With a new management team in place and high expectations from everyone after the 1992 rebound year, the Reds lost nine of their first 11 games to start the season. They rebounded to cross .500 at 19-18 and then went on west coast road trip where they lost six of seven games dropping them to 20-24. Bowden called Perez and fired him over the phone. From “Redleg Journal:”

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