This week’s respondents are Nick Doran, Nick Carrington, the inimitable Mary Beth Ellis, and Chad Dotson. Our Daily Reds Obsession: Which particular Reds team was your favorite? Nick D: I was too young to remember the Big Red Machine days, so I will take the 1999 Reds team that won 96 games and missed the […]

Who will be the next Reds Rookie of the Year? Will it be Nick Senzel? Jesse Winker? Shed Long? No one knows for sure. Most Cincinnati Reds who have won that award went on to have pretty good careers. There was Frank Robinson (1956), Pete Rose (1963), Tommy Helms (1966), Johnny Bench (1968). Pat Zachry […]

Daniel Matthews has contributed here at Redleg Nation a few times previously (here is his most recent contribution), and we’re always happy to have his perspective. Enjoy! No, it’s not our beloved Redlegs’ 2-1 defeat of the Oakland A’s in Game 4 of the 1990 World Series to complete the sweep. It’s the last two […]

Last week, Ken Griffey Jr. was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame with a record 99.3% of the vote. Griffey accumulated most of his Hall of Fame credentials in Seattle from 1989-1999. He was 1997 AL MVP, a 10-time All Star, hit 398 HR and was arguably on pace to break Hank Aaron’s career […]

2013 is looking good so far. Despite injuries to their #1 starter, starting leftfielder and cleanup hitter and catcher, the Reds are thick in the race for the Division as Memorial Day awaits. Their MVP is a Boy Named Choo, Votto is hitting like Votto and Bruce looks like he is in the beginning of […]

Mark Sheldon lists his top two picks for NL Player of the Month. The names include a guy that many of you covet (but who will never play in a Cincinnati uniform, I’d guess): Jay Bruce’s May: .346 avg, 12 HRs, 32 RBIs, 23 runs scored. He entered the night with a 1.103 OPS. Mets […]

November 16, 2000: In cost cutting moves, the Reds deal away popular semi-regulars catcher Eddie Taubensee and IF-OF Chris Stynes. The 1999 and 2000 Reds were some of General Manager Jim Bowden’s busiest transaction years. Trying to balance the team’s budget around the salaries of stars such as Barry Larkin ($5.3 million), Dante Bichette ($7 […]

October 3, 1890: Reds owner Aaron Stern sells the Reds to a group of investors, headed by Albert Johnson, who are tied to the newly formed Players League. The Reds temporarily withdraw from the National League just one year after being readmitted to the league following their 1890 banishment.

October 3, 1891: John Reilly smashes three triples in a game for the second time in his career as the Reds defeat the Chicago Colts, 15-9, in Chicago. Reilly is one of only four players, and the only Red, to hit three triples in a game twice in their careers. The win keeps the Reds out of last place as they finish the season 56-81, one game ahead of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

October 3, 1919: The Reds lose the first World Series game in their history, 3-0, to the Chicago White Sox in Chicago. The Reds now lead the White Sox in the Series, two games to one.

Rookie Dickie Kerr pitched a three-hitter and walked one to pitch the White Sox to victory. Kerr retired the last 15 batters of the game allowing only three runners to reach second base during the game.

Dolf Luque pitches one inning in the game for the Reds, becoming the first Hispanic American to appear in a World Series game.

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September 25, 1925: For the first time in major league history and still the only time in National League history, teammates connect for bases-loaded triples in the same game as the Reds wallop the Brooklyn Robins, 18-7, in Cincinnati. Curt Walker clears the bases for the Reds with a triple in the third inning and teammate Rube Bressler does likewise in the fifth. The Reds scored a total of nine runs in the third inning alone.

Only 534 fans show up in Cincinnati to see the third place Reds, who finish the season 80-73, 15 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Reds gained possession of third place back in July and had held the spot for two months.

For the game, the Reds have four players with three hits: Walker, Bressler, Elmer Smith, and Chuck Dressen. Reds starting pitcher Jakie May went the distance for the win, giving up 14 hits and seven runs, walking four.

Walker was the Reds starting rightfielder from 1924-30, playing 953 games in those seven years, batting .303 with a .378 OBP, and an OPS+ of 113. Walker finished in the top ten triples five times with the Reds, finishing second three times (1925-26, 1929). Bressler played 11 seasons with the Reds (1917-27) and was a pitcher as well as an of-1b. Bressler batted .311 in his time with the Reds with a .379 OBP (OPS+ 115). As a pitcher, Bressler pitched in 42 games and was 12-9 with a 2.76 ERA (100 ERA+).

September 25, 1951: Reds catcher Johnny Pramesa wins the game for the Reds as he clubs a 14th inning grand slam walk off home run in a 7-3 Reds victory over the St. Louis Cardinals.

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September 7, 1951: With the battle to avoid last place more boisterous than the battle for first, the Reds take 18 innings to beat the Chicago Cubs, 7-6, in Cincinnati.

The score was tied 3-3 after nine innings and both teams scored three times in the 15th. Cubs starter Bob Rush pitched into the 15th inning, going 14+ innings, allowing 10 hits, walking seven and striking out 10. The Reds won it in the bottom of 18th on a bases loaded sacrifice fly by catcher Dixie Howell. Dixie Howell played parts of four seasons for the Reds and was from Louisville, Kentucky. Dixie’s given name was “Homer.” Homer Bailey’s given name is David. In this game, Reds centerfielder Lloyd Merriman ties a National League record with 12 putouts. Ted Kluszewski reaches base six times, with a home run, a single, and four walks.

The Reds also win in extra innings the next night, 4-3, when centerfielder Bob Usher homers off the left field foul pole to lead off the bottom of the 12th. Harry Perkowski and Howie Fox pitched eight scoreless innings in relief to secure the win.

When the series began, three teams were within a half game of last place, the Reds, the Cubs, and the Pittsburgh Pirates, while the Brooklyn Dodgers held a five game lead over the second place New York Giants. However, the Giants closed the year 17-5 to catch and pass the Dodgers as this was the year of “the shot heard round the world,” with Bobby Thomson’s pennant winning home run. The Reds played well to end the season, too, finished 11-8, and placed sixth in the league.

September 7, 1974: In one of the most courageous moments in Reds history, Hall of Fame second baseman Joe Morgan refuses to leave the game despite having a sprained ankle and hits a tie-breaking two-run home run in the eighth inning as the Reds defeat the Los Angeles Dodgers, 7-5.

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September 5, 1973: For the second day in a row, the Reds explode in extra innings to beat the Houston Astros in Houston. The Reds use the three game series to move into first place in the Western Division, a lead they won’t relinquish for the rest of the season.

The Reds entered the three-game series with the Astros one game behind the division leading Los Angeles Dodgers. Having spent most of the season in third and fourth place, the Reds trailed by as many as 11 games as late as June 30. The Reds moved into a tie for first on the first day (September 3). While the Dodgers were losing 11-8 to the San Francisco Giants, the Reds scored two runs in the eighth inning on a Ken Griffey pinch single to beat the Astros, 4-3.

The Reds scored first on a second inning solo home run by Andy Kosco, but the Astros plated three runs in the fifth to take a 3-1 lead. The Reds got one run back in the sixth inning on a Pete Rose two-out single. The Reds won it in the eighth when Johnny Bench doubled with two outs. Kosco drew a walk, and Ed Armbrister, making his second consecutive start since his recall from AAA, reached on an infield single to load the bases. Ken Griffey, in his seventh game since his recall, then delivered a pinch two-run single giving the Reds their 4-3 lead and eventual margin of victory. Pedro Borbon pitched the final three innings of the game, surrendering no runs despite giving up six singles in those three innings. Former Astro Jack Billingham had started the game for the Reds and had pitched six innings, allowing three unearned runs.

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September 4, 1916: Reds manager and Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson makes his one and only appearance on the mound for the Reds and, ahem, “fires” a 15 hit-complete game to beat another Hall of Fame pitcher (and former Red) Mordecai “Three Finger” Brown and the Cubs, 10-8.

The win is an important one, for the Reds were in last place at the time and remained in sole possession of last place until the last day of the season when a 4-0 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates pulled them into a tie with the St. Louis Cardinals at 60-93, 33 1/2 games behind the first place Brooklyn Robins.

Mathewson was once property of the Reds, but for only a few days in November of 1900. Mathewson had joined the New York Giants in 1900 and went 0-3 with a 5.08 ERA in six games before being dispatched back to the minor leagues. The Reds drafted him from a minor league team in early November, but Reds owner John T. Brush traded him back to the Giants on November 15 for Hall of Fame pitcher Amos Rusie. Rusie had been one of baseball’s biggest pitching stars of the 1890’s, winning more than 20 games every season that he played from 1890-98 and winning more than 30 games in four straight seasons. He sat out 1899 and 1900 in a contract dispute with the Giants, but reported to the Reds after the trade. However, he only pitched three games with the Reds, going 0-1 with an 8.59 ERA in 22 innings and then he retired. Rusie’s final record was 234-163 with a 3.07 ERA. In five separate seasons, he led the major leagues in K/rate per nine innings, hitting a high of 6.01 in 1891.

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