November 13, 1940: Reds first baseman Frank McCormick (.309, 19 homers, 127 rbi) wins the Most Valuable Player award becoming the third consecutive Red to win the MVP. Catcher Ernie Lombardi (.342, 19 homers, 95 rbi) won in 1938 and starting pitcher Bucky Walters (27-11, 2.29 ERA) won in 1939. McCormick won the 1940 award […]

The National League Gold Glove winners are to be announced today. Hopefully, there won’t be any disastrous shocks like yesterday when Derek Jeter was awarded his fifth Gold Glove. The folks at baseball-reference.com were so mortified they even had a disclaimer next to the announcement (since taken down). The disclaimer was something like “We can’t […]

October 8, 1904: Rookie second baseman Miller Huggins strokes three triples in an 8-1 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals in St. Louis. The Reds’ win enabled them to sweep a doubleheader as they won the first game, 6-0.

The Reds were second in the league in 1904 with 92 triples, 10 behind Pittsburgh’s 102. Cy Seymour and Joe Kelley both tied for third in the league with 13 triples. Rookie Huggins finished with seven. For the season, Huggins batted .263 with a .377 OBP (OPS+ 110). Over six seasons with the Reds, Huggins batted .260 with a .362 OBP. He played 13 major league seasons, but is most famous for managing the New York Yankees to their first six World Series titles.

The 1904 Reds finished the season 88-65, in third place, 18 games behind the New York Giants. Seymour was their most effective hitter, batting .313 with 26 doubles and 13 triples (134 OPS+), while manager-1b Kelley batted .281 with 21 doubles and 13 triples (OPS+ 121). The Reds’ asset was their pitching, for they had six starting pitchers with ERA+ of 112 or higher. The Reds were third in the league with an ERA of 2.34. Jack Harper was 23-9 with a 2.30 ERA; Noodles Hahn was 16-18 with a 2.06 ERA; and Tom Walker was 15-8 with a 2.24 ERA. Win Kellum was 15-10 with a 2.60 ERA.

October 8, 1919: The Chicago White Sox get a complete game victory from Ed Cicotte and two run singles from both Shoeless Joe Jackson and Happy Felsch as they pull within four games to three by defeating the Reds, 4-1, in the seventh game of the World Series. The major principals for the White Sox were all later said to have been in on the Black Sox fix for the Series. Dolf Luque pitched four innings on one-hit shutout baseball in relief for the Reds.

October 8, 1939: The Yankees score three times in the tenth inning to sweep the 1939 World Series from the Reds. The Reds made four errors in the final game of the 1939 Series, and included the play noted for “Lombardi’s Snooze.”

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October 7, 1882: The National League champion Chicago White Stockings return a favor from the previous day by shutting out the American Association champion Cincinnati Red Stockings, 2-0.

The White Stockings, heavily favored as the National League champion over the newly formed American Association champion had lost the first game of the two game set the previous day, 4-0. After having played the first game with their best pitcher, Larry Corcoran, at shortstop, the White Stockings pitched Corcoran the second game and he shutout the AA champion Reds. Two unearned first inning runs were the only runs of the game.

No third game was ever played or ever scheduled. The White Stockings were on their way to play a post season tournament against the second place Providence Grays. The Red Stockings were fined $100 by the American Association for playing a postseason game against league wishes.

October 7, 1919: Chicago White Sox first baseman Chick Gandil singled home Buck Weaver with the go ahead run in the top of the tenth inning as the White Sox defeated the Reds, 5-4. The Reds still lead the best-of-nine series at four games to two.

The Reds had taken a 4-0 lead through four innings before the White Sox scored once in the fifth and three times in the sixth to tie the game. Dickie Kerr went the distance to win the game for the White Sox. Greasy Neale had three hits for the Reds.

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October 5, 1939: Yankees pitcher Monte Pearson holds the Reds hitless for seven and 1/3 innings as the Yankees shutout the Reds, 4-0, to take a two game to none lead in the 1939 World Series.

The Yankees reached Reds starter Bucky Walters for five hits in the third inning, plating three runs, and later added a Babe Dahlgren fourth inning home run to account for all their scoring. The Reds’ Billy Werber was the Reds’ only baserunner before the eighth inning, drawing a fourth inning leadoff walk. However, Werber was erased trying to steal second base as Lonnie Frey struck out. The Reds got their first hit on an Ernie Lombardi single in the eighth inning. Werber got the Reds’ only other hit, a ninth inning single.

October 5, 1940: The Reds’ Paul Derringer pitches a five-hitter to win his first World Series game in six starts as the Reds evened the 1940 World Series at two games each with a 5-2 victory over the Detroit Tigers.

Derringer had previously started two World Series games in the 1931 classic while with the St. Louis Cardinals and the 1939 Series with the Reds as well as the opening game in the 1940 Series before notching his first WS victory in this game. His career walk rate was 1.9 in regular season play, but he averaged 4.6 walks per nine innings during his postseason career and he walked six in this 1940 victory. Four different Reds had two hits in this game with Ival Goodman collecting two rbi.

October 5, 1961: The Reds even the 1961 World Series game at one game apiece as Joey Jay pitches a four-hitter while Gordy Coleman and Johnny Edwards each collect two rbi in a 6-1 win over the New York Yankees.

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October 4, 1902: The Pittsburgh Pirates set a new major league record with 103 wins as they defeat a disinterested Cincinnati Reds team, 11-2, in Pittsburgh. Rain had dampened the grounds in Pittsburgh and the Reds did not want to play, but the Pirates insisted on playing the game to have a chance at playing the record. The Reds played many players out of position in protest of playing the game.

Pitchers were first baseman Jake Beckley and star outfielders Mike Donlin and Cy Seymour. Seymour and player-manager Joe Kelley were reported to have been smoking cigarettes in the game. The catcher was pitcher Rube Vickers who set a modern major league record (still standing) of six passed balls in one game.

October 4, 1919 Jimmy Ring fires a three-hitter as the Reds take a 3-1 World Series lead over the Chicago White Sox with a 2-0 victory.

Both Reds runs came in the fifth inning when they took advantage of two errors by White Sox starting pitcher Eddie Cicotte. With one out, Reds outfielder Pat Duncan reached second base when Cicotte threw wildly to first base after fielding Duncan’s ground ball. Larry Kopf then singled to left to score Duncan and was safe at second base when Cicotte dropped a throw at second base as Kopf was trying to stretch the single into a double. Greasy Neale then doubled to left field to score Kopf and provide the last run of the game.

Ring walked three and struck out three, while Cicotte allowed five hits and walked no one.

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October 3, 1890: Reds owner Aaron Stern sells the Reds to a group of investors, headed by Albert Johnson, who are tied to the newly formed Players League. The Reds temporarily withdraw from the National League just one year after being readmitted to the league following their 1890 banishment.

October 3, 1891: John Reilly smashes three triples in a game for the second time in his career as the Reds defeat the Chicago Colts, 15-9, in Chicago. Reilly is one of only four players, and the only Red, to hit three triples in a game twice in their careers. The win keeps the Reds out of last place as they finish the season 56-81, one game ahead of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

October 3, 1919: The Reds lose the first World Series game in their history, 3-0, to the Chicago White Sox in Chicago. The Reds now lead the White Sox in the Series, two games to one.

Rookie Dickie Kerr pitched a three-hitter and walked one to pitch the White Sox to victory. Kerr retired the last 15 batters of the game allowing only three runners to reach second base during the game.

Dolf Luque pitches one inning in the game for the Reds, becoming the first Hispanic American to appear in a World Series game.

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October 2, 1877: The Reds finish one of their worst season in Cincinnati baseball history, by losing to the Chicago White Stockings, 13-1. The 1877 Reds, who had disbanded and restarted at mid-season, finish the year 15-42 in last place, 25 1/2 games behind the first place Boston Red Caps. The Red Caps were remnants of the original Cincinnati Red Stockings team, led by George Wright and managed by brother Harry Wright. The 1877 Reds won-loss percentage of .263 was tied for second worst of all time.

The 1877 Reds were led by superstar Charley Jones, who batted .310 with an .819 OPS (168 OPS+) in 55 games. He had the second highest WAR (wins above replacement rating) in the league in 1877 (3.2), not that he knew that at the time since it’s a recently developed metric. Shortstop-manager Jack Manning batted .317 (OPS+ 151) and outfielder-manager Lip Pike (142 OPS+) also had strong years. The Reds used three different managers during the season. Pitching was the Reds’ downfall as their staff ERA (4.19) was nearly a run worse than any other team in the league.

October 2, 1892: The St. Louis Browns score eight runs in the top of the first inning, but the Reds come back to win the first game of a double header, 12-10. The Reds also win the second game, 4-1, to sweep the Browns. The 1892 Reds go on to finish in fifth place.

October 2, 1919: The Reds win the second game of the 1919 World Series, 4-2, over the Chicago White Sox in Cincinnati. The Reds now led the best of nine series, two games to one.

The Reds struck for three runs in the fourth inning when White Sox starter Lefty Williams ran into control problems. Williams, who had averaged 1.8 walks/9 innings for the season, walked three Reds hitters in the inning leading to three Reds runs on a single by Edd Roush and a triple by Larry Kopf. The Reds added an insurance run in the sixth when Greasy Neale singled home Roush. The White Sox scored their two runs in the seventh when Ray Schalk singled to score two, aided by two Reds throwing errors on the play.

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September 18, 1940: The Cincinnati Reds clinch their second consecutive National League pennant with a 13-inning 4-3 win over the Philadelphia Phillies. Johnny Vander Meer pitched twelve innings, allowing eight hits and walking five, but striking out 11 in improving his record to 2-0. Ace Reds reliever Joe Beggs retired the hometeam Phillies in order […]

We’ve reviewed some of the major components of the first two Cincinnati World Championship teams. We know that championship teams need big time players, but it takes more than just stars to win a championship (see Ernie Banks).

Briefly, here’s how the other guys came about….watch for the number of waiver wire and contract purchases…it takes a combination of scouting for waiver wire acquisitions, trades, and, yes, even spending some money to win championships.

1919 Reds–Record of 96-44, with a winning percent of .686–highest in modern Reds history
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On his website, baseball historian, writer, statistician, and current Red Sox baseball executive, Bill James was asked for his opinion of the worst all-around team outfield of all time (hitting, fielding, baserunning)…here was his answer:

The last Bill McKechnie outfield with the Reds, whenever that was (1947?) was astonishingly awful. Let me find it. . .

1946 Reds. Their regular outfield was Dain Clay, Al Libke and Eddie Lukon. With 16 teams in the majors there were 48 regular outfielders. If you ranked them 1 through 48, none of the Reds would crack the top 40.

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Some links from around the Reds blogosphere…. —Blue Collar Baseball notes that Sean Casey may be retiring from baseball. Redleg Nation wishes The Mayor all the best. He’s one of my personal favorites, and he was always a great representative of the Cincinnati Reds organization. –Justin has done a quick and dirty analysis of shortstops […]