Thank God for Tony Cingrani. The lefthanded rookie hurler kept the Redlegs from getting swept out of Washington, DC with a true gem this past Sunday. Six innings of work, no runs, 11 strikeouts and a win. And this didn’t come against the Marlins or Cubs, either. Reds and lefthanded pitchers who are successful don’t […]

October 7, 1882: The National League champion Chicago White Stockings return a favor from the previous day by shutting out the American Association champion Cincinnati Red Stockings, 2-0.

The White Stockings, heavily favored as the National League champion over the newly formed American Association champion had lost the first game of the two game set the previous day, 4-0. After having played the first game with their best pitcher, Larry Corcoran, at shortstop, the White Stockings pitched Corcoran the second game and he shutout the AA champion Reds. Two unearned first inning runs were the only runs of the game.

No third game was ever played or ever scheduled. The White Stockings were on their way to play a post season tournament against the second place Providence Grays. The Red Stockings were fined $100 by the American Association for playing a postseason game against league wishes.

October 7, 1919: Chicago White Sox first baseman Chick Gandil singled home Buck Weaver with the go ahead run in the top of the tenth inning as the White Sox defeated the Reds, 5-4. The Reds still lead the best-of-nine series at four games to two.

The Reds had taken a 4-0 lead through four innings before the White Sox scored once in the fifth and three times in the sixth to tie the game. Dickie Kerr went the distance to win the game for the White Sox. Greasy Neale had three hits for the Reds.

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September 24, 1924: Reds starting pitcher Carl Mays wins his 20th game of the season as the Reds defeat the Philadelphia Phillies, 9-6.

Oh, wait…may be this happened on September 20th….baseball-reference.com’s bullpen says it’s the 24th of September, as does “Redleg Journal” (by Greg Rhodes and John Snyder), but baseball-reference.com’s team pages say it was September 20th. Nevertheless, Mays becomes the first pitcher to win 20 games with three different teams. Mays won 22 and 21 for the Boston Red Sox in 1917-18, won 26 and 27 for the New York Yankees in 1920-21, and won 20 for the Reds in 1924. Only two other pitchers won 20 or more games with three different teams, Hall of Famers Grover Cleveland “Pete” Alexander and Gaylord Perry.

Mays finishes his 1924 Reds season with a 20-9 record and a 3.15 ERA (119 ERA+). Mays had one another excellent Reds season, going 19-12 with a 3.14 ERA and leading the league with 24 complete games in 1926. For his career, Mays was 208-126 with a 2.92 ERA; with the Reds over five years, Mays was 49-34 with a 3.26 ERA. Mays is best known or an unfortunate incident, for he’s the only major league pitcher to kill a batter with a pitched baseball. Cleveland Indians shortstop Ray Chapman was hit in the temple by a Mays pitch (Mays was with the New York Yankees at the time) and died the next morning. Mays wasn’t a popular player and this made things worse and some teams called for him to be banned from baseball. Mays said repeatedly the incident was an accident, but the beaning may have been what has kept Mays out of the Hall of Fame. More about Mays can be read here.

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September 5, 1973: For the second day in a row, the Reds explode in extra innings to beat the Houston Astros in Houston. The Reds use the three game series to move into first place in the Western Division, a lead they won’t relinquish for the rest of the season.

The Reds entered the three-game series with the Astros one game behind the division leading Los Angeles Dodgers. Having spent most of the season in third and fourth place, the Reds trailed by as many as 11 games as late as June 30. The Reds moved into a tie for first on the first day (September 3). While the Dodgers were losing 11-8 to the San Francisco Giants, the Reds scored two runs in the eighth inning on a Ken Griffey pinch single to beat the Astros, 4-3.

The Reds scored first on a second inning solo home run by Andy Kosco, but the Astros plated three runs in the fifth to take a 3-1 lead. The Reds got one run back in the sixth inning on a Pete Rose two-out single. The Reds won it in the eighth when Johnny Bench doubled with two outs. Kosco drew a walk, and Ed Armbrister, making his second consecutive start since his recall from AAA, reached on an infield single to load the bases. Ken Griffey, in his seventh game since his recall, then delivered a pinch two-run single giving the Reds their 4-3 lead and eventual margin of victory. Pedro Borbon pitched the final three innings of the game, surrendering no runs despite giving up six singles in those three innings. Former Astro Jack Billingham had started the game for the Reds and had pitched six innings, allowing three unearned runs.

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A few notes from this past week in baseball history… I was sparked to do this watching the bogus ESPN top ten moments in all-star history. Frankly, it really annoyed me, and it goes back to some comments written the other day about the lack of positive Reds coverage shown on ESPN. I guess it […]