A defensive play is at least five times as hard to make as an offensive play. An error by a fielder can come from a bad throw, a bad hop of the ball, the muff of an easy chance, or a mix-up of responsibility between a shortstop and second basemen, or two outfielders, on a […]

“I want the voting in the hands of the fans, but not if they make a joke out of it.” Frank Lane St Louis Cardinals General Manager, 1957 Current Reds owner Bob Castellini likely remembers the above quote; if not, he certainly remembers the incident that generated it. For it’s his reintroduction of Mr. Redlegs […]

On Monday, former Reds pitcher Pedro Borbon died after a long battle with cancer, Our thoughts go out to his family during this time of loss. We’d also like to take this moment to celebrate his life, for Borbon was a pertinent piece of the Big Red Machine. His career as a Red was memorable, […]

Those who LOVE baseball find themselves appreciating the month of February more than most people, simply because it’s the month that the game starts to loosen itself from its winter slumber. While it’s still winter, many teams have had some teammates working out together all winter, but more often than not the players are dispersed […]

“Good hitting will always stop good pitching, and vice-versa.” Casey Stengel One of my favorite baseball historians, Chris Jaffe, has a great article up at The Hardball Times titled “10 things I didn’t know about one-hitters.” The piece focuses mainly on the men who have had the only hit in a one-hitter game, making them […]

“Let us go forth awhile, and get better air in our lungs. Let us leave our closed rooms… The game of ball is glorious.” Walt Whitman The winter in the Pacific Northwest is one of short days and long nights. It’s a lot like Michigan, just not as cold. In Michigan the winters were spent […]

It’s apparent, now that the dust from the World Series has settled, and as with every big loss, fingers have begun to point towards incidents and players who can be seen as shouldering part of the blame of the losing side. For, though baseball is a team game, it’s also an individual game of small […]

In 1976 my family moved to Cincinnati. At the time I was a Tigers fan, a disciple of the American League. That changed damn quick. I guess you can say I stepped into a good thing and 31 years later I’m still waiting for that same feeling to return, a feeling of sustained greatness, a […]

My pitching philosophy is simple – keep the ball away from the bat. Satchel Paige In 2004 Eric Milton won 14 games for the  Philadelphia Phillies. He also allowed 43 home runs which, amazingly, wasn’t the most allowed in the game that season (Jamie Moyer, 44) but nevertheless, that total WAS the 5th most HRs […]

It’s my belief that baseball is a game that is made up of more small moments that craft themselves into  great and memorable moments than any other sport in the world.

Even Buzkashi

The game’s natural movement from step A to step B enables small dramas to be inserted into contests throughout the season, and the years. This is what shapes our baseball memories, small moments, significant to us and often to  the history of the game  On the franchise level, the Reds grabbed the golden ring as summer kicked off with a bang when one player became the 27th Red to perform a rare batting feat…a feat that is so rare that only 23 players in the long history of the franchise have achieved it. A feat that Ted Kluszewski accomplished, Frank Robinson as well… why, Gus Bell did it twice!

Heck George Foster did it….and even Pete did it.

But ya know what?

Joe Morgan never did it. Ken Griffey Jr., Tony Perez and Adam Dunn never did it. Lee May, Wally Post: nope.

But Chris Heisey has.

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Brian first met the greatest game in Detroit in 1968, that team played in a league called the “American League”…. but I digress.

Later after a family move he started a dalliance with the Cincinnati Reds, who perchance were in the midst of their greatest era. It was a romance that was greater than many could hope to be.

After barely stomaching the strike of 1981 Brian headed West but never forgot the Reds, and even despite being surrounded by Giants and A’s fans who tried to entice him with things both Green and Orange he found himself wondering what was up with Kal Daniels and was that kid from Moeller ever going to make us forget Davey.

A long time member of SABR and a baseball history junkie he currently lives in Portland and can be followed at @baseballminutia

Most Reds fans know the Reds have a previous history with the Yankees; some point to 1976 and the Reds sweep during the crowning glory of the Big Red Machine. Others point to 50 years ago this summer, when the Reds surprised the baseball world and ended up in the World Series, staring down the […]

Picking Nits

The older you get, the more baseball you’ve probably watched, and with this fact comes a great responsibility, a solemn task that all fans of the game undertake. You can’t resist it; it’s in the fans DNA. Of course I’m talking about… picking nits, mulling the obvious, and sifting through the past.

Thom Brennaman has a habit that most announcers possess, in that he speaks with authority on a subject (in this case “baseball”) consistently enough to please most listeners, but occasionally he states a fact as an absolute truth when in reality it’s not even remotely true. This past weekend, it was the time honored statement that the Cincinnati Reds were the oldest team in baseball, which is no where near the truth.

They do hold a distinction that is unique: they were the first all professional team.

They were in the original National League, but were expelled for selling beer and other liquid refreshments favored in those days for daily intake. The current version of the Reds trace their legacy to the old American Association (AKA The Beer and Whiskey League) founded by former Enquirer sportswriter O.P Caylor in the early 1880’s.

For those interested, the oldest teams in professional baseball are listed below.

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Brian first met the greatest game in Detroit in 1968, that team played in a league called the “American League”…. but I digress.

Later after a family move he started a dalliance with the Cincinnati Reds, who perchance were in the midst of their greatest era. It was a romance that was greater than many could hope to be.

After barely stomaching the strike of 1981 Brian headed West but never forgot the Reds, and even despite being surrounded by Giants and A’s fans who tried to entice him with things both Green and Orange he found himself wondering what was up with Kal Daniels and was that kid from Moeller ever going to make us forget Davey.

A long time member of SABR and a baseball history junkie he currently lives in Portland and can be followed at @baseballminutia