The Short Version: The Reds are shut out on one hit by Pirates starter Jameson Taillon, and Eugenio Suarez breaks his thumb. Can things get any worse?

Final R H E
Cincinnati Reds (2-6) 0 1 0
Pittsburgh Pirates (7-2) 5 11 0
W: Taillon (2-0) L: Mahle (1-1)
FanGraphs Win Probability | Box Score

The Good
–Nothing is good. Everything is awful.

The Bad
–Eugenio Suarez was hit on the hand with a pitch in the top of the fourth inning. He stayed in the game to run bases — at least long enough for Scooter Gennett to hit into a double play — but was replaced by Cliff Pennington (or “Chad” Pennington, as Thom called him on the television broadcast) when the Reds returned to the field in the bottom half.

We learned later that Suarez has a fractured thumb, and is likely headed to the disabled list.

Not a good development, especially since the Reds are already playing short-handed thanks to a HBP-caused injury to Scott Schebler.

–Tyler Mahle started the game fairly well, but things kinda fell apart on him in the bottom of the fifth inning, allowing four of the five Pirate runs he surrendered on the day. His final line: 4.2 innings, 5 earned runs allowed on 9 hits and one walk, with 5 strikeouts.

–The Reds got one hit. One. And that hit was collected by the pitcher, Mahle.

–Another curious decision by manager Bryan Price today. With a short bench, thanks to the unavailability of Schebler and the injury to Suarez, Price made the decision to double-switch Mahle out of the game when Amir Garrett entered. Phil Gosselin entered the game, shifting Pennington over to shortstop. That left just Phillip Ervin and Devin Mesoraco* — who was also not available because baseball managers think that it is illegal to use a backup catcher to pinch-hit — on the bench with four innings still to play.

Not necessarily a bad decision, but kinda odd.

*I wrote that three innings before Price used Mes to pinch-hit!

Not-So-Random Thoughts
–Mahle is young. Young pitchers are inconsistent. For most of the day today, he was in control. Tyler Mahle will be fine.

–In both of his appearances this season before today, Yovani Gallardo has entered in a two-run game — including Friday, which precipitated this. Amir Garrett, who really should be starting games (in this author’s humble opinion) has been nowhere to be found most of the season thus far. Today, of course, Price brings Garrett into the game with the score 5-0 to be the mop-up man.

Garrett, by the way, pitched 2.1 scoreless innings of relief today.

Why not start him tomorrow instead of Cody Reed? Why not bring him in on Friday in a close game? Your guess is as good as mine.

–Baseball is just so dumb.

Today’s Tweets

Blame Chad for creating this mess.

Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, “The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds” is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad’s musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine.

Join the conversation! 77 Comments

  1. Yuck. And after the game I heard a commercial that said “I’m Thom Brenneman, voice of the Cincinnati Reds.”

    Salt, meet wound.

    Reply
  2. If Suarez is out for a month or more, this season could get very ugly very quickly.

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    • Rather he take his time coming back, we do not need anything that lasts a long time.

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    • Ten days into the season and it’s already looking ugly.

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    • Yes, but thankfully we have Price as our manager because he is a billion times better than Bob Boone or Jerry Martin were. Whew! Can you imagine where we would be if those guys were in the dugout?

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    • Crap, I thought that the Reds were WS bound. I hope that Suarez is signed past this year …

      Relax people. It’s APRIL 8th.

      Reply
  3. If guys are going to pitch inside with reckless abandon why should a small market team ever invest longterm on any players? MLB needs to do something about it, we’ve lost two players to injury due to HBP and it could have been worse.

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    • It happens, AB. I get the history with the Reds and Pirates. But Taillon was threading it today. I don’t see recklessness or intent there. Got to have an iron gut when giving out contracts. Also doesn’t hurt to put into perspective that Suarez will only be out 2 – 4 weeks.

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      • Ironically, probably the most maligned Bryan Price thought as you. Something like,hey let’s tip
        our hats to a superior guy like we did with the 3 from Wash, the invencible Trevor Williams and the supreme Kuhl.

        Listen, I’m all for peace and love, stop the violence and so on. But in my book, enough is enough.

        BTw, in 2-4 weeks and with Votto, Duvall and Gennett looking worst than Paul Janish, this team will be 10 games out of it. But I’m not the one to cut your fun short, so heck, enjoy!

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    • A little more perspective on the pitch that plunked Suarez…

      That pitch was not thrown at his hands. That pitch was thrown at his head. In Suarez’ batting stance, his head is in front of his hands as he initiates his swing. With the ball bearing down on his head, Suarez stood upright from his crouch and tried to lean back away from the ball, leaving his hands where his head had been located just milliseconds earlier. Instead of a broken thumb, Suarez could be looking at a career-threatening if not a life-threatening injury. That’s Clint Huirdle baseball at its worst.

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  4. Garrett about the only positive. No-brainer to bring up Senzel, isn’t it? Set-up line.

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    • April 13th is the magic date. Make it happen IMO

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    • Which makes it even more baffling why he’s not in the rotation. He had a good start to the season last year then got injured. He got healthy, had a good spring and seemed to be the Garrett that started last year on fire, but for some reason Price decided “Nope, we got better options for the rotation.”

      Just completely baffling.

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      • I legitimately cannot stand price and the Garrett bull pen situation there are zero logical reasons why he is not starting

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        • It’s already been explained, remember? He is in the bullpen because of the left handed dominant Cubs and Nationals in the first 2 series. And once a role is defined it cannot be changed.

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        • Is it possible that the Reds are limiting his innings now so that he’s available to start later in the year when Mahle, Reed etc. are reaching innings limits? I can’t think of anything else that makes sense, unless there’s a health issue that isn’t being discussed.

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          • By the time anyone reaches an innings limitation, the rosters will be expanded, the Reds will be buried in the standing and Reds pitchers will once again be pitching against AAA/AAAA competition. That’s good for an initial exposure to MLB, but not for finding out what player can do at the MLB level against MLB competition.

    • Looks like Blandino.

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  5. I’m not a fire the manager type of guy, but this time I think Bryan Price has to go. There is no spark in this team. Look in the dugout and the players look like they’re at a funeral. it’s time to shake things up!!

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    • I’m not either but Dick needs to have a number for a wins and date marked in his secret calendar. If the threshold isn’t met then bring on the interim. Nothing changes on this team. Everyone is the same or has regressed from initial appearances.

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    • The dugout looks like a funeral because the players are playing like the living dead. I’m not a Price fan at all, but unless the new manager is a player-manager who can hit, the problem won’t be solved.

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      • I have never known a time when I was less optimistic about the Reds future than I am now. Price is not a manager and should not be in the dugout. The Reds were winners in 2013 and losers in 2014-2017 (with Price) with this year looking to be the worst year of Price’s time. Are the Reds ever going to become a winner again???

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  6. BLARGH to the 15th power!!!!

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  7. I’m going to be optimistic.
    The Reds weren’t winning in 2018.
    Suarez will be fine by summer.
    Blandino gets an opportunity and perhaps the Reds FO now can focus on 2019 and playing the players who need to play in 2018 to win in 2019.

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    • But if Blandino and Suarez haven’t gotten the majority of the ABs at 3B by this time next week, I give up.

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  8. The issue is that Price said today that most of the innings will go to Pennington and Gosselin. They’ll bring up Blandino and let him rust away on the bench just like he did with Winker last year.

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    • If true that is discouraging. Pennington provides zero offense. Gosselin has questionable defense. Blandino is young and has potential and deserves the bulk of playing time during a rebuild season.

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  9. It just seems like this is a perfect situation give a young guy (Blandino) some playing time to see if he can show anything. Pennington and Gosselin are never going to be anything but bench players. The team is not going to contend this year, so suffering from a poor performance if Blandino can’t deliver is meaningless.

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    • Blandino will be able to show us what he can do if Price does not keep him warming the bench like he did Winker last year. We shall see.

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  10. 90 losses again
    Bryan Price won’t be the manager in 2019.
    Young Pitching gets reps. Perhaps Garrett and Disco get 15 starts from August 1 on .
    Good draft pick in 2019.
    This lengthens Price managerial reign till the second half of the season but he is still gone

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  11. Alex Blandino is on his way to the airport to meet the Reds in Philadelphia tomorrow for a 7:05 game.

    Last season, Blandino slashed .270/.390/.444 with a 137 wRC+ in 63 games at AAA after slashing .259/.374/.462 with a 145 wRC+ in 62 games at AA.

    Last season, Cliff Pennington slashed .253/.306/.330 with a 73 wRC+ in 87 games at MLB after slashing .209/.265/.308 with a 57 wRC+ in 74 games at MLB in 2016.

    Last season, Phil Gosselin slashed .146/.180/.188 with a -7 wRC+ in 40 games at AAA after slashing .277/.324/.368 with an 80 wRC+ in 122 games at MLB in 2016.

    In addition to last seasons performance, Alex Blandino outplayed both Pennington and Gosselin during ST. The prevailing logic espoused that Blandino, who was already on the 40-man roster, was sent to AAA while Pennington and Gosselin, non-roster invitees, were promoted to the 25-man roster in order to guarantee regular playing time for Blandino since Blandino was a prospect with MLB upside for the future while Pennington and Gosselin were stop gaps to get through the 2018 season.

    Now that Blandino is being promoted to the 25-man roster and needs regular playing time as a prospect with MLB upside for the future, anyone want to hazard a guess at who does not start at 3B for the Reds tomorrow and wastes away in the dugout for the next few weeks?

    Reply
    • There is little doubt that Blandino will not play. If you have barely passable players like Pennington and Gosselin, you just have to play them. As you noted Blandino is the best of the 3 which should mean that the manager would play said player. Unfortunately, this is the Reds organization we are talking about.

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      • So, if Price’s job is (and this is speculation) at least in part based on the performance of the team (wins and losses), does playing Penningtion or Gosselin give him a better chance at winning that Blandino? Based on the slash lines Cossack posted, it doesn’t seem like it. I’m afraid however that Price will view it as veterans being likely to make fewer mistakes, thus the need to play them over Blandino. Guess we’ll find out in the next few days.

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        • If Price’s job security is/was even partially tied to team wins/losses, he would be gone already. Like everything else associated with the Reds, I think Price’s job security is completely tied to the whim of BC and that’s sad. I do think Price learned his management philosophy from Dusty and inhereted Dusty’s penchant for the veteran presence on the 25-man roster and starting lineup.

          The Reds know what to expect from Pennington and Gosselin at the MLB level. No one knows what to expect from Balndino at the MLB level. The Reds had a great opportunity to find out by promoting Blandino to the 25-man roster out of ST and utilizing him in a platoon at 2B to ensure regular playing time for Blandino. DW and Price passed on the opportunity. The Reds have now been hammered with an even better opportunity to find out what Blandino can do at the MLB level with consistent playing time due to Suarez’ injury and extended absence from the 25-man roster. Once again DW and Price will pass on the opportunity and let Blandino rot on the bench.

          Reply
    • Well he won’t start tomorrow because he will be acclimating to the MLB environment and learning the ropes therein. But hopefully he starts after that with rest as needed.

      Reply
  12. Do not annoint Senzel as the Reds savior before he completes his development at AAA and proves he is MLB ready Let the kid play at AAA for 50-60 games and see how things shake out. There is simply no rush to get him to MLB early during the 2018 season.

    Reply
    • Senzel’s situation is not comparable to Kris Bryant’s situation. Bryant put up a 1.036 OPS in AAA durng 70 games at AAA in 2014 before the Cubs delayed his promotion to MLB for 7 games in 2015. Senzel has now played just 3 games at AAA.

      What might be fun would be to send Suarez down to AAA for a rehab assignment before reactivating him from the DL and let Suarez and Senzel play together at AAA for 2-3 weeks before Suarez returns to the 25-man roster. They could even hold down the left side of the IF for the Bats during that time.

      Reply
  13. Listened to first part of the game on the radio. A couple of things came to mind.

    #1Hamilton grounds into a FC with Winker up next. Now with 2 outs, Hamilton does not try to steal second, and Winker grounds out. In this situation, shouldn’t it be an automatic that Hamilton tries to swipe the base? If he makes the 3rd out, Winker is up next inning, with little harm done. If he steals, Winker has an RBI opportunity, and probably wouldn’t be pitched around, what with Suarez coming up next.

    #2: Suarez gets hit, stays in the game to run the bases, and gets forced out. Dude’s thumb was broken – why even take the risk of an injury getting worse by leaving him in the game to run? Suarez was taken out right after that 1/2 inning, so the Reds knew something was up.

    #3 Intentional or not, a man responsible for 5 RBIs the night before gets plunked and injured. Where was the reprisal by the Reds? Pirates are notorious for hitting people – why would the Reds just sit back and take it? I wish this team had some more fire to it.

    Reply
    • Your take on all 3 situations is spot on.

      The most egregious was leaving Suarez in to run the bases. Price even commented after the game that he didn’t see any problem with leaving Suarez in to run after the injury, even knowing that he would be removed from the game before taking the field. What?!?!?! That’s the ‘most stupidest’ decision and comment I have encountered and Price has way more than his share on that list of the top 100 ‘most stupidest’.

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      • Clearly none of us are candidates for the Reds manager position, because we are too smart, or not stupid enough.

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      • Yeah, thankfully he didn’t break his thumb worse running the bases.

        What’s worse is that he was HBP, they called a timeout, he went in for X-Rays, his thumb injury was confirmed to be a break, he came back out, and Price sent him back out to run the bases.

        Egregious.

        BTW, was it a wheel barrow race, or did he run the bases in a traditional manner?

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    • 100% agree with #3

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    • I don’t disagree, but will point out that the Reds are notorious for hitting Pirates. I’m not sure that the pitch was meant to hit Suarez so much as move him back, which is legitimate.

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  14. The Reds now have 4 starters in the lineup with a sub .500 OPS, even before moving Suarez to the 10-day DL and replacing him in the starting lineup. In addition, Schebler is unable to play and has not been moved to the DL. That leaves Barnhart, Winker and Gennett as the only players in the starting lineup with an OPS > .500. That makes for a pretty easy pitch around for any team serious about winning.

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  15. I don’t believe Mahle is major league ready yet and it has nothing to do with his performance on the mound today.I thought he actually had a pretty good performance, if the home plate umpire was even close to being competent. Mahle’s game is working the edges and corner of the plate. The umpire was simply not giving him valid stikes on the edges of the plate, forcing him to pitch to the hitters in the meat of the strike zone, with the expected results. Mahle does not have the ability to miss bats if he can’t pitch to the edges of the plate.

    I caught some of the post game coverage and an interview with Mahle. The interviewer was trying to be gentle and non-judgemental, but Mahle was having difficulty retaining his composure during the interview, forcing the interview to be cut short. I think the kid just had it too easy coming up through the minor leagues with only 24 starts at AAA. I don’t know if he has the mental toughness yet to deal with the setbacks he will experience at the major league level.

    Reply
    • Mahle can “learn on the job”. I don’t think there’s much more for him to gain by pitching in AAA. He needs to learn that sometimes MLB umpires won’t give him the calls he’s used to getting, so he needs to learn how to make adjustments and get people out at this level.

      I mean, what’s the point of him going back to AAA? This team is going nowhere, so I have no problem with him continuing to pitch (and possibly lose) a lot on this level as long as he’s learning. Now, if it looks like his confidence is starting to take a beating, then ok. But from what I’ve heard, Mahle is someone who battles, someone who listens to advice, and someone who learns quickly (as opposed to, say, Robert Stephenson). Let’s see how he handles his next few starts and see if he can grow into a MLB starter before our very eyes.

      Reply
      • Concur with your opinion. Mahle will never learn how to handle failure unless he experiences it. Let’s get that part of the learning process over with now.

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    • You know that I love the ol’ Cossack, but I couldn’t disagree more. Mahle has nothing left to prove in the minors. This is very likely going to be a lost season anyway, so let him pitch and learn. I don’t care if he puts up an ERA of 5.61 this season. He needs to pitch every five days against big league hitters. (That was the ERA Greg Maddux posted in his first full MLB season.)

      And I’m not sure what you mean that he “had it too easy coming up through the minor leagues.” He was at least 2 years younger than the average age at every level in the minors. Yet he flew through every league, getting hitters out.

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      • My concern was hot his ability to pitch effectively or produce good results. His performance on the mound against the Pirates didn’t bother me one iota. I expect him to take his lumps as he learns and adjusts. That interview was disturbing to me. I didn’t expect such an emotional, submissive reaction to a bad game.

        His age may be the issue that bothers me, at least his emotional age. Maybe it was just an isolated reaction to his first poor results on the biggest stage of his life. If so, then it’s a learning and growing experience and he moves on to bigger and better things.

        A move back to AAA may not provide the experience (adversity) he needs since he has dominated at every level coming up, including AAA. That’s what I meant by having it too easy. His ability and stuff simply dominated at every level, much like Cingrani, another four-seam dominating pitcher through the minor leagues. This may be a situation where a pitching coach, manager or experienced verteran needs to have a positive impact. It may also be just a one-time occurance from a competitive pitcher with excessively high personal expectations. Shoot, Joey may even be able to relate to the young man on both a competitive and emotional level.

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        • So do we need to start thinking about sending Castillo down for some AAA seasoning as well? He wasn’t sharp in ST and has not looked good during the regular season yet either.

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      • He was also at or near 100 pitches, and the drop off in his performance was so marked that I susupect that he was simply gassed.

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        • That’s a very good point. He was pitching in trouble a lot and had thrown a lot of pitches. There could have been both physical and emotional fatigue impacting him after the game. Once he establishes a reputation for pinpoint control at the MLB level, he will start getting the benefit of the doubt on the close pitches.

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        • That’s what I thought.

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  16. The Reds bullpen ain’t as bad as it feels.

    Garrett, Peralta, Hughes & Igelesias have pitched 15.2 innings, giving up 2 ER. That’s a 1.20 ERA for those 4 pitchers. They have a composite WHIP of 0.77, AVG .400, 2.7 HR/9 & 0.38 K/BB. Equally unfortunately, Price has utilized the 3 poor performers in the bullpen in higher leverage situations than the 4 great performers in the bullpen. That’s why the bullpen feels so inept. Don’t tell me the manager has no impact on the team’s performance on the field.

    Reply
    • You’re not wrong, but a few small problems with that quartet. For one…Garrett needs to be in the rotation or they’re only farther away from using Iggy more then once-twice/week. Peralta and Hughes would probably be ok in the set-up roles, but they’re going to be losing much more often they’re winning in the 7th inning. The other guys are all destined to turn 3-1 deficits into 6-1 in a hurry. Quackenblast, Gallardo, and Brice are all garbage. Losing Lorenzen and Shackelford didn’t help either.

      I just know I’m already annoyed at the gnashing of teeth over the injuries we’re going to hear from Price and DW. CYA comes into effect when ones job is being threatened and thats the easiest branch to grab. Truth is they both fail miserably if this team is 100% healthy. Maybe 73-74 wins if they were the healthiest team in the division.

      Reply
    • Just how broadly are you defining higher leverage situations? Are we really counting down two runs in the 7th inning as high leverage?

      Even if we counted that, what other appearances by Brice, Stephens, Quackenbush, or Gallardo would you consider high leverage?

      C’mon man. Price has enough problems, but this is a completely false narrative that you are creating.

      Reply
      • Hughes had hardly been used and he chose an untested Gallardo over him in a 2 run contest (3rd game of season). I understand he might consider Hughes a set up guy but when you have off days and the guy has hardly pitched I see no reason why Gallardo would get the call on a day when nearly everyone else is available. This guy missed most of ST, Price has seen very little of him, but apparently has no qualms throwing him into the fire, that just makes no sense and is frankly inexcusable. He should be mop up till he earns trust. And Garrett who Price described in pre season as “snorting fire” has been coming in for mop up duty. That makes no sense.

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        • That is a completely different statement than the one SHCHI COSSACK made.

          Hughes had actually pitched in back-to-back games on March 30th and March 31st, so he it made sense to not pitch him again the third game of the season. Yes, I realize he only threw 1/3 of an inning in his second appearance, but bullpen pitches count too, and games early in the season + cold weather, the manager is more likely to be very conservative with usage. I

          I don’t like Gallardo, I think he’s probably toast…but the truth is if a manager can’t put in any pitcher in the game down two runs in the seventh, the fault lies elsewhere. Teams don’t really carry straight mop up guys anymore.

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  17. I don’t care what you guys say: Phil Gosselin is a UVa legend and he should be the starting 3B for the rest of the season.

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  18. well, it looks like redleg nation will soon gets it’s wish of a lineup consisting of our guys
    1. winker
    2. Senzel
    3. Votto

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  19. totally off topic but how was Molina not ejected from the Cards?/Dbacks game?

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  20. First time through the rotation was optimistic. Quality starts by Bailey, Romano, & Mahle. 2nd time through was not very impressive. No sp made it past 5 innings. There’s plenty room in this current rotation for both Finnegan & Garrett.

    Reply
    • 8 games with 3 quality starts. 1 was the minimum 6ip 3er from Romano. Yeah….I’d say they could put up the “Help Wanted” sign.

      Miami has won 3 games even though they’ve played the Cubs and Boston in 6 of their games. Derek Jeter made more then their entire roster…..in 2002. SD has zero talent and they won 3 games more then the Reds last year. Playing smart and hungry counts for something.

      Reply
      • Up here in the still-frozen North Woods, I watched Reds and the Detroit version of the Toledo Mud Hens this weekend while we froze-below zero to start Sunday morning, ugh. Tigers traded off almost their entire team and are playing with a roster mostly right out of “Major League.” So, with a manager who manages and breathes a little fire into that group of vagabonds, they go into Chicago and sweep the ChiSox while playing hard, while the Reds…well, you know. I went into the season thinking the Tigers might be the most unwatchable of those I follow. But my feeble mind forgot the Price Factor. (And yeah, the Tigers may still lose 95-105 games with this bunch.)

        Reply
  21. I’m sure he didn’t mean to break Suarez’s thumb, but I find it hard to believe that a guy who has shown pinpoint control in his two starts just happens to lose a ball up and in when pitching to the guy who hit–and more importantly from the Pittsburgh perspective, watched–the game winning homerun the previous day. That was a purpose pitch, and yes, it deserved an answer from somebody on the Reds staff.

    Bummer for us. Senzel’s future position isn’t third base, so he shouldn’t take development time away from second and SS just to plug a temporary hole on a team going nowhere. That would be like putting Garrett in the bullpen because “we need another lefty”.

    Reply
    • Pittsburgh does have a tendency to be a little dirty in multiple sports. It wouldn’t surprise me one bit…

      Reply
  22. Seriously it is time to move on from Price. I am already over this. Good pitching coach, horrible manager.

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  23. Again, people over look the positives in yesterday’s game. Yovani Gallardo pitched a scoreless 9th inning. Soon, he will be making starts. That’s why they got him, to be veteran starting pitcher.
    Something is OBVIOUSLY wrong with Castillo, and he will be sent down if he gets bombed a couple of more times. And then, Gallardo gets installed into the rotation for a series of terrible starts.
    It’s the Red’s way of doing things.

    Reply
  24. I am ok with what happens as long as the young guys get to play on the mound or in the field.Signing vets to pitch or play in the field while younger guys watch in the pen or on the bench is just plain dumb.This organization needs to fish or cut bait and stop trying to do both.This year has never been about winning unless the stars align perfectly(no injuries and the young starters exceed expectations) but there are some things that can be done to get this team ready for next year.The biggest thing is to just let the young guys play such as letting Blandino get the majority of the playing time while Suarez is out.I mean why wouldn’t this organization do that?I thought he should have made the team but I can understand they wanted him to play every day in the minors.So you bring him up and let him watch from the bench?

    Reply
    • Just plain dumb? I find your lack of faith in Bob Castellini, Dick Williams and Bryan Price disturbing.
      Where would you get such an idea?

      Oh, you’ve been following the team. Never mind.

      Reply
  25. Blow this thing up already! Turn everything upside down and see what happens? Peralta used to be a starter and has 3 quality pitches. That’s 1.5 more then Romano. That’s 2.5 more then Reed.

    Bud Norris is now a halfway decent reliever that used to be a starter. Hint hint….Homer will not be a part of the next winning Reds team. Actually he’ll probably be on social security when that happens and I’ll be hanging out with my family. The Giants gave Matt Cain a ton of money and he sucked…they just took it on the chin and left him in there. Don’t do that!

    Garrett/Peralta > Reed/Bailey

    Kyle Crockett > Gallardo….no more washed scrubs. A hospital doesn’t go thru as many worn out scrubs as the Reds. Tanner Rainey > Quackenbush. Homer is a competitor…let him try the setup role? Doesn’t have to pace himself so maybe he can throw hard again?

    Senzel plays. Blandino plays. Trade Iggy for as much as you can get.

    We’ve seen the same old same old already.

    Reply

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About Chad Dotson

Blame Chad for creating this mess. Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, "The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds" is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad's musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine.

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2018 Reds, Titanic Struggle Recap

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