The Short Version: A close game becomes a blowout in the blink of an eye because Reds manager Bryan Price decides to give up and put in a garbage pitcher. This is getting really old. That’s the short version. This nonsense is getting really old.

Final R H E
Cincinnati Reds (1-5) 3 13 1
Pittsburgh Pirates (6-1) 14 15 1
W: Williams (2-0) L: Castillo (0-2)
FanGraphs Win Probability | Box Score

The Good
–Jesse Winker got three hits. Joey Votto, Luis Castillo, and Jose Peraza — if you can believe it — had two hits. Billy Hamilton reached base three times (!), with a hit and two walks.

The Bad
–Bryan Price.

–The signing of Yovani Gallardo to a $750,000 major league contract. I am a big fan of the current front office, but add this one to the list of inexplicable moves.

–As the game went to the bottom of the sixth, the Pirates were leading 4-2, but the Reds had threatened a couple of times and the game’s ultimate outcome was certainly in question. Luis Castillo had battled through another bout of poor command, and he was forced to leave after five innings. Manager Bryan Price chose to go with the corpse of Yovani Gallardo at this point in the game.

Look, I understand if Gallardo was signed to be a mop-up man. I mean, it doesn’t make much sense, since he has been one of the worst pitchers in baseball the last two seasons. But whatever, if he’s only pitching in 10-2 ballgames, I guess it’s okay.

The game was 4-2 when Gallardo entered. It was 10-2 when he left, after recording just one out. Everyone on earth knew that putting Gallardo into this game was an incredibly risky move, since it was still close. Well, everyone on earth except for the person who mattered.

I’m not smart, but I simply do not understand why this guy is on the Cincinnati Reds roster. And if he is still on the roster tomorrow, it will raise some interesting questions about this organization. DFA him, and after he clears waivers, send Gallardo to Triple-A to be roster-filler. He’s getting paid either way.

–Gallardo gave up 6 runs in a third of an inning. Compared to that, Austin Brice was brilliant: four runs (three earned) in 1.2 innings, surrendering five hits. (For the record, I think Brice has a chance to be a decent big league pitcher. He’s 25, he has a live arm, and he’s in a different category than Gallardo.)

–The Reds threatened in the top of the first, but some shoddy baserunning ran them out of the inning. Winker led off with an infield single (maybe a gift from the scorekeeper, but whatever). One out later, Votto singled to center and the Reds were in business. Almost immediately, however, Scooter Gennett followed with a line-out to left. Somehow, Votto was doubled off first and I don’t think I can give it a better explanation than that. I have no idea what Votto was thinking there.

Votto wasn’t happy:

–Jesse Winker dropped a can of corn fly ball. One of the worst defensive plays you’ll see in the big leagues.

–Reds hit into three double plays tonight.

Not-So-Random Thoughts

–Tonight is the night that I wash my hands of Bryan Price. I’ll never call for anyone to be fired. Price seems like a decent human being, and I would never wish for anyone to lose their job. Seriously, this is real life for Price and his family, and it’s not my place to scream that he should lose his job.

But it’ll be awfully hard for me to defend him after the last few days. I mean, the Gallardo nonsense is completely indefensible. Sure, he was forced upon Price, but no one is forcing Price to put Gallardo into games that are still close. And it’s just one thing after another. Take a look at this:

Think about that. The Reds have faced lefty starters three times this season, and our manager has chosen to lead off my favorite player in those games. I love Billy, and that has not changed. But leading him off against lefties…it’s just indefensible.

Too many indefensible moves. I am literally the most patient Reds fan on earth. And all those indefensible moves adds up to one thing: I’m not going to defend him.

–The Reds tied up the game at two with a couple of runs in the top of the third, thanks to a couple of unusual suspects. Luis Castillo led off with a double to deep center, and that was followed by a Billy Hamilton walk. Castillo scored on Winker’s second infield single of the night and, one out later, Votto singled home Billy. Game tied 2-2, for a brief period.

The Pirates scored two in the bottom of the third, but the Reds came right back with a two-out rally in the following frame. Castillo collected his second hit of the night, a single to left, and that was followed by a Hamilton single. Winker singled after that, but Eugenio Suarez flew out to end the rally.

–Eugenio Suarez played a couple of innings at shortstop. File that away as we try to figure out what the plan might be for top prospect Nick Senzel.

–If you read this recap, after tonight’s debacle, you are a true Reds fan and a loyal citizen of the Nation.

Today’s Tweets

Blame Chad for creating this mess.

Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, “The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds” is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad’s musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine.

Join the conversation! 85 Comments

  1. Finally realizing that Price is one big problem is progress. Now could you un-block me on Twitter. Just kidding.

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  2. Masterfully written Chad. I just don’t see how Price survives the 1st half of the season with any more performances like that.

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    • I’m with Chad on not wishing for someone to lose their job–and this is from someone who has fired many an employee over the past 30 years. However, I may have made the final decision on it but those employees sealed their fate with their performance. Price’s decisions, like bringing in Gallardo last night, leading Billy off against left handers among others, give fans lots of reasons to question why he is still in charge. I suppose if he does eventually get fired this season, we can hope for a replacement who knows what he’s doing. Unfortunately, I’m not all that confident that they won’t just hand the job to Barry Larkin without a comprehensive search. If so, Larkin may turn out to be a great manager, but I have serious doubts about that.

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    • It makes one question the objective of management . . . as Cozart implied when he went to the Angels.

      Small sample size, but have the Pirates accomplished in one off-season more than the Reds have accomplished in four?

      Hats off to Votto for maintaining that competitive spirit . . .

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  3. Please don’t forget that Price plays Tucker vs lefties and Mesoraco vs righties. I guess he doesn’t own a computer? He should really try and get the best matchup for Mesoraco to take advantage of the 30 games he’s available for this year!

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  4. I turned this game off when Price put Gallardo in. Either Price is trying to get fired or Dick Williams is trying to get rid of him, if not both.
    I can’t consider this organization seriously until this tean gets an experienced GM and competent field manager.
    Why waste a season of control of Senzel to be a team mate of this lot of dregs?

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    • Which is very painful to me. At 62yo I don’t have many seasons left.

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      • Hey, I’m 63 but I plan to live to at least 90 (based on family history there’s a reasonable chance of that). Not sure even that will be enough time.

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        • I have been a Reds fan for over 40 years and I am going to remember the 1990 championship. Hard to believe it is almost 30 years already. The Reds are a long way from competing for another World Series.

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          • I am with you there.
            This i year 49 as a Reds for me.
            (Man I getting old).
            I still remember 75 and 76 also.
            Time for changes.

        • First game: 6/22/1964

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  5. Not only am I here for the recap, I bought your book. Where is my Wayne Krenchicki card?

    (LOL).

    You might want to have the annual Redleg Nation fundraiser sooner rather than later, just in case Captain Price takes this thing into the abyss even earlier than in past seasons.

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  6. Misery loves company, so thanks for suffering with me Redleg Nation.

    Chad, your recap did an excellent job expressing my frustrations of Price. Enough is enough.

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  7. In regard to Price being on the hot seat and Chad’s reluctance to call for his termination, well I see it this way…

    Sometimes it’s more cruel to keep someone employed in a position they’re unsuitable for than to let them go. The man had success as a pitching coach and maybe that’s the sort of position he needs to return to. Maybe that’s his niche. Or maybe he’ll be one of those managers who will eventually, with another franchise, achieve success. But, for whatever reason, he’s struggled here and I don’t see any indication that he’s the sort of man to manage the much-hoped-for “next good Reds team”.

    I think that, in the long term, it would be healthy for both Price AND the Reds if they parted ways. Instead of trying to fit a square peg (Price) into a round hole (Reds managing success), they need to let him go so he can find a place where he can regroup and, eventually, flourish. Price can’t be happy to go to work each day. He needs to find a position that’s a better fit . He has talents applicable to MLB, managing (at this point) just isn’t one of them.

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    • I have always said that Price is a pitching coach—not a manager. He is misfit and has learned nothing about how to be a good manager since becoming one.

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  8. This was a bad night.

    Still, only one game out of 162 and comparatively, the Reds have had a much tougher schedule to date than say…the Red Sox. (Nats, Cubs, Pirates in crap weather vs. Sox having Marlins and Rays in Florida, Rays at home).

    It feels like the Gallardo signing means one of two things, both of which are troubling:

    A) The Reds are still in bargain-hunting/hoping to flip mode, which isn’t what teams on the upswing, close to contending, do.

    B) The club in general is struggling with roster construction and/or talent evaluation, especially talent not in its minor-league system. Scooter feels more like the exception as an outside addition, not the rule.

    Price’s usage of Gallardo is criminal. But, signing him to begin with was as well. Dick Williams making public comments defending it would be interesting to hear.

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  9. Immediately after the debacle in the 6th inning, My wife sat down to take in a couple of more episodes of The Crown. I saw the leaders of an empire in deep decline in deep denial or ignorance even of the decline. As they muddled through, their underlying drive seemed to be not to rock the boat, to keep on doing things like they had been done for generations because after all that was what made the empire great.

    And we seem to have similar thinking with Reds. No one seems willing to stand up and break the mold. Where does the direction come from? What is it? Who is really in charge? Does anyone really know?

    As Steve Mancuso has pointed out again and again, at critical turn after critical turn, the organization seems to be manned by a mix of like thinking insiders and yes men syncophants who follow the group think. I fear we will not se significant change in the quality of the product until we first see real change in the thinking that drives it.

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  10. I’m with you on Price. Nice guy, great pitching coach, poor manager. Hamilton bats right-handed (against lefties), making his appearance on that list even worse. Playing him against lefties, much less leading him off, is indefensible.

    And I get wanting the new guy to get his feet wet early, but it’s unfair to toss him to the wolves like that, to say nothing of tanking the game for everyone else interested in winning. When Larkin or Farrell or Dusty Baker (hehe) gets the job at season’s end, tonight will be remembered as a great illustration of why.

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  11. If I remember right, either last year or the year before Price commented something to the point that- if they are on the roster I should be able to use them/ as what they can do.

    Had to post just to establish my true Reds fan-ness

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  12. I was very happy to see Suarez at SS. Hopefully they start to transition him back there and let Senzel have 3B, then let all remaining INF in the organization duke it out for the right to play 2B for the future (Scooter, Peraza, Long, Herera, Alfrod, Downs, et. al.). It’s much easier for a SS to move to 2B than it is for a 3B to move to SS or 2B.

    I feel this is the best solution for the team, long term. PLEASE make Suarez the SS and be done with it.

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  13. Price needs to be fired I will call for a mans job. His family is fine he has probably made more than enough money helping to run this team into the ground.

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  14. Price for Manager of the Year

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  15. I wonder who the top half dozen amateur prospects will be in the 2019 draft.

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  16. The Reds aren’t winning in 2018. They never were. Dick Williams admitted in the off-season as much when he justified the non-activity by saying the Reds aren’t one player away yet.

    They are 1-5 with 12 games in the next 12 days against the Pirates, Phillies, Cards and Brewers. Its not inconceivable they go 4-8 in those games and hit their next off day 8- under .500 by mid-late April. The schedule doesn’t get easier. Historically awful in April is still very much in reach for this bullpen and this offense and this team. The remaining five games on this road-trip are huge for Price to salvage April and his job. Their offense isn’t hitting home runs and is in hibernation when Joey Votto isn’t playing at an MVP level. The bullpen is a dumpster fire. Iglesias/Hughes/Garrett and Peralta are being underutilized situation-ally.

    Tony Perez was fired after 44 games in 1993 and Price is very much in danger here as Castellini will need a scapegoat and a fiery press conference to re-engage Reds fans to buy tickets this summer. Hiring an interim manager will also give the Reds plenty of time to work on their next manager for 2019. Its only a matter of time before Riggleman is named interim manager. Is it May 1, June 1 or the All Star break?

    Firing Price wont make the Reds win in 2018. This season is still about the starting pitching and that process needs to continue to play out. Homer Bailey hopefully can re-invent himself as a solid #4/5. His days as a power pitcher are over. Luis Castillo will be fine once the temperatures get warm. He is still a sophomore. Mahle and Romano are where they need to be. Amir Garrett is probably the one huge question I would have for Dick Williams. If the Reds aren’t going to be in a pennant race in September, why is he sitting in the bullpen throwing 1 to 1and 2/3 innings every 3-4 days? What is his role in 2019 when the Reds should be winning? Isn’t 2018 preparation for 2019? Its also important in 2018 to determine which players will be back in 2019? Scooter Gennett could be a huge trade piece at the deadline. He needs to play every day and bat 4th/5th and hope for that June hot streak where he hits 8 home runs in a month. Is Billy Hamilton coming back in 2019? I would argue he could be a valuable trade piece at the deadline to a playoff contender who needs a boost in its outfield defense and late inning bench options. How long does Peraza get at SS? At least till June. Don’t rush Nick Senzel either. He isn’t saving 2018. Let him be fully prepared with 200-250 at bats in AAA.

    The Reds play 19 of 27 games at home from June 5 till July 4th. That month is when the Reds need to sell a lot of tickets for the 2018 season. Assuming health and continued production, Nick Senzel will be playing on June 5th and Bryan Price wont be managing.

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    • Some really good points here by Old School. The one other variable not mentioned is bullpen health. If Lorenzen, Hernandez, Shackelford (and Finnegan) return soon, it could have significant impact on the trajectory of the season. Not to “hey, we’re really good” levels. But taking fans off the “screw them, I don’t care any more” ledge. But if those guys don’t get back, things could be really ugly.

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  17. Not in defense of Price as a manager, but, why would the Reds fire Price during this season? They knew that this is how he manages when he was retained for this season.

    Once again, the Reds are putting the same team on the field that has lost over 90 games for 3 straight seasons. As others have noted, there is no creativity or understanding of how to build a team. If the Reds think they can compete in this division with Peraza, Gennett, Hamilton, Duvall, and Schebler, then they will continue to be at the bottom. The other teams are passing them by.

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    • Don’t forgot Votto. He has been a mainstay on these losing teams as well.

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    • I agree that firing Price now seems late but by the end of the season we will be asking…how did Gallardo last so long? Why did Hamilton bat leadoff against lefties every time? Why didn’t Amir Garrett start from the beginning? Why did Senzel “practice” 2B in the minors to move in the majors (SS or 3B to cover Suarez moving over)?

      This team/franchise invites a lot of head-scratching every year (last year it was why Adelman/Feldman/Arroyo and where’s Winker?!).

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    • It would be more of a PR/symbolic move to the fan base.
      Castellini will say we aren’t getting the results we needed and we are going to fix it and get the rebuild back on schedule.
      They need to sell tickets this summer and if the Reds are effectively out of it…..AGAIN…..before school is out, then the Reds risk a huge loss at the gate from a disinterested and apathetic fan base. Price is truly in deep trouble because DW and BC need a scapegoat if things deteriorate further.

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  18. I’ll let my 6 year old daughter speak for me as she yelled “stop it! Get that guy out of there!”

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  19. A good move would be to trade Gennett by deadline and send Peraza down to AAA. That would allow to switch the IF among Suarez, Blandino & Sensel, with (ideally) Suarez at 3B, Sensel at SS and Blandino at 2B. The OF should be patrolled by Winker in LF, Ervin in CF & Schebler in RF. Duvall may very well become a bench player as 4th OF, 3rd corner IF, DH for interleague games and/or bench bat. Looks like there won’t be no more room for Hamilton in the roster.

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  20. Chad, thanks for telling it like it is. The Castellini group is taking the fun out of baseball. This is disgusting.

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  21. Unfortunately I had to experience the game in person, thank God the ticket was free. Although with my friend who gave me the ticket sitting next to me I couldn’t get up and leave!…lol. That was 3 1/2 hours of my life i won’t get back. Unlike the writer I am not a fan of the Reds front office and Bryan Price needs to go! That said I have no faith in them to choose a competent replacement.

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  22. After I started reading, I had to scroll back up and double check who was writing. You are a patient man Chad and this sort of frustration level has been brewing for quite some time. You may also be a better man than me, because I will absolutely call for Price to lose his job. (In my opinion he should be set on financial security over the last several years being an MLB manager, so it’s not like he’ll be out in the streets or since baseball is filled with so much retread he’ll find another gig somewhere).

    No much to be excited about in Reds land after the start to this season. Doesn’t appear the losing is being us, not as long as Price is filling out the line up card and making decisions. It’s truly unfortunate we’ve wasted so many good years of Votto’s career watching absolutely miserably played baseball.

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  23. There’s no reason to continue the agony by wading through another losing season with Price at the helm. Let him go and he can soon return to his talent as a pitching coach with another team. Make Riggleman the interim manager and do a real search for the best manager in 2019 for this franchise which has a lot of talent and potential.

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  24. Given how long they stuck with Alfredo Simon in 2016, I’m expecting Gallardo to have a long leash.

    Recall Simon gave up 61 ER in less than 59 innings. That’s about as bad as can be, since usually you don’t make it to that many innings with a 9+ ERA.

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    • Hoping the model is more Kevin Gregg.

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      • Amazingly, Gallardo would need to give up only 4 more ER in his next 9.1 IP to match Kevin Gregg.

        Woof.

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    • This is my worry as well. Hope I’m wrong. With all the arms in Louisville (Weiss, Rainey, Herget, etc.), it’s not like they have no other options. But I think they’ll give him several more outings before eating the $750K and cutting him.

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  25. The Reds are like the Bengals in that they’re very tardy making obvious changes. There’s no reason to keep Price anymore. Get Farrell now. Quit screwing around. Heck, I’ll take Riggleman over Price. I don’t blame Votto. I’m sick of rebuilding/losing too.

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  26. “If you read this recap, after tonight’s debacle, you are a true Reds fan and a loyal citizen of the Nation.”

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  27. I agree with BIGREDMIKE. This roster cannot win the Central. I fear another rebuild.??? I really believe the Reds have at least 3/5ths of the starting rotation on this team or in the organization. But, they need to put Winker in LF. & leave him alone. The jury’s still out on Schebler. Scooter will not be in Cincy in ‘19, so they can put Senzel at 2B. That means, at the very least, they need a SS. & a CF. And at least 1 of those guys has to have a good bat. There’s a lot of work that STILL needs to be done. To much work, for me to believe they will be ready for playoffs by ‘19. IMO.

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  28. I’d like to see the Reds target David Ross as their next Mgr.

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  29. I only have one thing to add. I’m not sure what it tells us, but it’s the one thing that hasn’t already been covered: Price was determined to bring in Gallardo, even as the game situation changed around him. Gallardo started warming in the 3rd, when Castillo was on the verge of imploding, and there was a good chance Price was going to have to pull his starter very early with the Reds in a big hole. In other words, that might have been a reasonable spot for Gallardo (so long as he’s on the roster).

    Castillo pulled through, but still on the edge, gave up 2 more runs; as far as I know Price wasn’t warming anybody else up but Gallardo. Price managed to get 5 innings out of Castillo, but that was clearly it–someone else needed to come in for the 6th. In the top of the 6th, the Reds had guys on 2nd and 3rd with two outs, and a single would have tied the game. As far as I know, Price wasn’t warming up anybody but Gallardo.

    So Gallardo was coming in, whether it was to mop up in the 3rd, or pitch in a close–maybe even tied–game in the 6th. These are completely different game situations. His entire bullpen was somewhere between fresh/ready and underutilized in the last 4 days, so it makes no sense that the mop up guy was also going to be the “pitch in a close game in the middle innings guy.”

    This kind of failure to adjust, like his failure to adjust and keep leading Hamilton off against LHP with alternatives readily available, is why I, too, am done with Price.

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    • Amen. That was a close game/potential win absolutely derailed by one awful call. Unlike Gabe Kapler, we have few years showing that’s the norm and the is no “the numbers suggested” counter argument to any of it.

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    • That’s important context to add. Price plainly sees Gallardo as his “long reliever” and that includes the 6th and 7th innings in games when the Reds are behind by a couple runs. Problem is that Gallardo can’t get through 1 inning, which is a poor quality for a long reliever. Also, it’s the second time Price has used Gallardo when the Reds were down two runs. That’s not a blowout. In fact, the first time was against the Nationals and the Reds rallied and scored more. The two runs Gallardo gave up in that game proved decisive.

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      • If you want to be more trouble by Price’s thinking on usage of Gallardo, then read the Athletic article today. Make sone think that Gallardo will get a longer rope than did Kevin Gregg. Reds fans, buckle up. It’s going to be an arduous journey through the 2018 season. Spoiler alert: you won’t see “winning baseball” return this year or next.

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      • Except we were a Winker single away from tying the game with two outs, and as far as I know there was nobody else up. So if Winker had singled, Suarez had popped up on the next pitch….Gallardo would have been coming into a tie game in the sixth. With an underworked bullpen full of better options. I don’t think Price really would have meant to bring Gallardo into a tied game, and I doubt he really wanted to bring him into a close game after what happened the last time he did it. Price just never adjusted to what was happening once Castillo rescued himself, which is a pretty big failing in a 5th year manager.

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  30. I would like to see Pennington or Gosselin in for Peraza and Ervin, or even Williams in for Hamilton. And, of course, Price sent packing. This team is obviously not responding to him.

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  31. If you make a comment on Twitter to @Reds they say “Thank you and Trust the Process.” If you ask them: “What is the Process?”….crickets, they do not have an answer.

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  32. That is remarkable. My comment from last night after the game got deleted. All I did was ask who was the ivy league genius in the Reds front office who pushed for the Gallardo signing?
    And I did call for Dick Williams to be fired. Comments no longer welcomed at RLN. OK.
    Please delete my account as I stop my monthly contribution today.

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    • I strongly encourage you to contact Chad/ Redleg Nation about this before reaching any conclusions. The contact address listed at the top pf the website is redlegnation2014@gmail.com Sometimes things just happen.

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      • Thanks Jim. I didn’t violate any comment guidelines that I can think of. It is very disappointing. It kind of hit me the wrong way and just made me furious. It wasn’t a glitch or snafu.
        I always enjoyed your writings and comments. But I believe I am done here. Take care.

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    • Comment was deleted because you made a derogatory personal characterization of Dick Williams by changing his name. That’s a violation of site guidelines. Obviously, your comments are welcome since we haven’t deleted any of the other 4,146 of them, the majority also calling for Williams to be fired.

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      • Sorry about the typo. I didn’t purposefully change his name.
        The “d” is right beside the “s” on the keyboard. My fat finger hit the “s” by mistake. That was not deliberate. On me for not proofreading better. But you cannot edit your comments after you see you made a mistake.
        But I am done. Good-bye.

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        • A Tootblan….it happens. You have given great trade ideas in the past. Can you come up with a trade deadline deal that gets the Reds their next CF?

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      • Steve, thanks to you and Chad for letting me be a part of this community for several years now. Bit this is beyond the pale. I will miss RLN and the many good articles generated at this site and the slew of good writers you have.

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  33. One of the funny things with this team: you can’t tell if Gallardo is on the team because the manager really wanted him and the front office acquiesced, or if he’s on the team because the FO really wanted him and the manager acquiesced. Or they both wanted him.

    Any of those answers is plausible, which shows the depth of our problems.

    Speaking of problems, I’m still having to type in my email and user name for every single comment. Is it just me? Help!?!

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    • You’re not alone. If I stay on the site, I can type more than one comment without re-entering but if I leave RLN then come back, I have to type it all in again (like for this comment).

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      • I have to retype it even if I don’t leave the site. But thanks for letting me know I’m not the only one with a problem.

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  34. Lots of blame to go around when it comes to Gallardo..

    When the Reds are successful with one of their scrap heap pick-ups (like Scooter Gennett) the front office praises the scouts and analytics department that identified the qualities that would prove successful.

    So when one of those pick-ups fails in a spectacular manner, like with Gallardo, the blame has to be spread around as well. Were there really scouts who saw Gallardo as a promising reliever? Did the analytics people really see something in his stats from the past two seasons to give them reason for optimism?

    Was there any pressure to pick up Gallardo (or a pitcher like him) from Bryan Price, Walt Jocketty or ownership? I checked and Gallardo never pitched for Jocketty in St. Louis.

    The Gallardo signing, while cheap, is of a piece with the Kevin Gregg acquisition and also, sadly, giving Bronson Arroyo 11 starts last year.

    All that said, nothing makes Bryan Price put Gallardo in games the Reds still have a reasonable chance to win. Jeff Brantley said last night, if Jared Hughes was available to pitch the 8th inning, why wasn’t he used in the 6th when the game was still within reach. Brantley also said it was obvious to him that Gallardo doesn’t have anything left in the tank (that’s his cliché, not mine).

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    • I don’t think that Simon (the first time), Straily and Scooter are really the same level of “scrap heap” that we’re talking about with Gallardo (or Gregg, or Marquis, etc.) Objectively there’s been more of a chance for the good signings to work out if you look at age and recent performance.

      (From an analytics standpoint, I’m guessing someone fell in love with the idea of Gallardo’s curveball being some underutilized secret weapon. Anyone know if his spin rate is particularly attractive, or there’s some trend about swing and miss or ground balls or something on that pitch for him? That plus veteraniness might have created a group of Gallardo supporters.)

      As I noted above, I think Price was getting ready to use Gallardo “properly” as a mop up guy, and then for some reason couldn’t adapt when the game situation changed. If Price has a role for Gallardo of “comes in if it’s the 6th inning or earlier even if the rest of the bullpen is fresh, regardless of the game situation” then he’s an even worse manager than I could possibly imagine.

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    • I shudder to think how many losses this team would have had without Gennett last year. Well past the century mark.

      And this year, he already has as many hits for both Votto and Suarez.

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      • We’d have been better off having Peraza get in a full season of work in the field and at the plate. And this year he has zero walks, and as many RBI as Billy Hamilton (1). But what really scares me is a desperate front office committing to keep him because he’s a “fan favorite” who “plays with energy”.

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        • Have watched MLB for over 50 years and I’ve never seen a weaker hitter than Peraza. Has he even gotten a ball out of the infield this year?

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  35. How long are we going to put up with this? How many more weeks or months of this season? When will the Reds take some drastic action? I don’t care about bobbleheads or fireworks or gimmick promotions. Why do we subject ourselves to this night after night? Castellini needs to clean house.

    Reply
    • This should begin with the Bob himself. He should never insert himself into baseball personnel decisions. If he gets too personal with the players ( and I’ve heard he has) it can cloud his judgement. Just because you like someone personally doesn’t mean they should be signed to a long term deal or not be traded. Votto, Hamilton,, Price…anyone. .

      Reply
      • I’m not sure what people think Bob C. should say when asked about players. Should he come out and say…”I don’t think Hamilton has a future on this team, his days are numbered here.” All owners are going to publicly say they love their players, whether they do or not.

        Reply
        • What???
          He said I want Billy to be a Red forever.

          He’s never said that about anyone!!!

          What is it about Billy beyond his on field record that Reds ownership is screaming from the mountaintops about? It’s irrational from an owner.

          Reply
          • I’m sure he’d say that about any of his player…IN PUBLIC.
            Except maybe Gallardo

    • The fans have the last say. If there is enough negative reaction and fan protest things will change. Don’t forget the fans chased Joe Morgan out of town.

      Reply
  36. That was one of the sorriest performances I’ve ever seen. They need the Bull Durham shower beat-down: It’s a simple game. YOU CATCH THE BALL, YOU HIT THE BALL, YOU THROW THE BALL.” Lollygaggers is too kind a word for this version of baseball. Price has lost the team. Their body language speaks volumes.

    Reply
  37. And another thing: Can the front office honestly think that things are going to get better this season with Price at the helm? Could it get worse if they make a change? Like everyone here I love to go to the ballpark. But I’m not going to travel and spend a decent amount of money in Cincinnati to watch this garbage. I have no idea if the Red’s brass reads any of our comments on here and I’m not pretentious enough to give them advice on how to run the club. But they should be extremely aware that this brand of baseball will eventually erode their fan base.

    Reply
  38. Cubs go outside their organization and picked up Steve Cishek (lifetime 2.70 era…allows .216 batting average). They got Justin Wilson last year (3.26 and .220 allowed). They picked up Mike Montgomery in 2016 (3.44 and .232 allowed). Cards picked up Miles Mikolas from the Japanese league for their rotation. He has good stuff. Dominic Leone for their pen (2.56 era last year…holding hitters to a .202 batting average).

    These weren’t huge expensive signings either! I think Mikolas cost $17.5 mil for 2 years. If the Reds are going to be so strapped with signing the 1st baseman, 1 starter, and a catcher that they can’t sign anyone else then maybe they shouldn’t give out $20-21 mil/year contracts? Price is terrible and cost them games every month, but no manager could come anywhere close to .500 with what Dick Williams has given him to work with? If if the young rotation really finds their stride….the pen is so sketchy and the lineup is so faulty that they’ll never be able to maintain a hot streak.

    The rebuild needs a rebuild. The Reds are the Cleveland Browns of baseball at this point. San Diego has no talent and finished 3 ahead of the Reds last year with 3 playoff teams in their division. They’ll probably beat the Reds again

    Reply
  39. Ervin in CF today…against a righty, instead of game 1 vs the lefty.
    Winker leading off.
    No Schebler.

    Reply
    • Schebler got hit on his elbow…ulnar nerve per Thom last night…. He’s having problems feelng his fingers. They miss him.

      Reply
  40. Comment earlier said “Price has lost this team.” That’s absolutely correct. The players know their is little or no accountability. The Reds need a fire-eating manager, a guy like Ozzie Guillan. But my worst fear (and prediction) is that Rigglemann will get the call.

    Reply
  41. Players have been through a lot of fire to get to the major leagues in the first place. I doubt a fire-eating manager is needed to motivate young guys who want to make a successful career. Walter Alston, a quiet guy from Dartown, Ohio, north of Cincinnati had a HOF career as the Dodger’s manager with only a long period of one year contracts. And who thought that Sparky Anderson would be a successful manager in 1969?

    Reply

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About Chad Dotson

Blame Chad for creating this mess. Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, "The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds" is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad's musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine.

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2018 Reds, Titanic Struggle Recap

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