[Caveat: I only saw the last inning. I heard the post-rain delay part of the game on the radio. Jason Linden had covered the game until midnight, but like a huge portion of the crowd at the friendly confines, Jason was done in by the rain delay.]

The Reds dropped the third game of the series after splitting the first two. They play the finale tomorrow at 8 p.m.

Reds 3, Cubs 4 | FanGraphs Info | John Fay: Reds shouldn’t fire Bryan Price

Joey Votto had two hits including a solo home run. He’s hitting .296/.398/.556 with and on pace for 37 home runs. Kristopher Negron had two hits. Eugenio Suarez hit a 2-run homer.

Manny Parra and Ryan Mattheus continued the solid bullpen effort this series. They threw 3 shutout innings, bringing the total for the series to 9.2 consecutive scoreless frames.

Mike Leake started and made it through 5 innings, giving up three runs. He only struck out one Cubs hitter and walked none.

Tucker Barnhart picked Addison Russell off second base in the eighth inning after Russell had led off with a double.

In the bottom of the ninth, Tony Cingrani gave up a run without recording an out as the Cubs twice took advantage of Billy Hamilton’s arm. First, Cingrani got to a 2-0 count on Kris Bryant before Bryant lined a single to center and took an extra base on Hamilton, whose throw was well up the second base line. An accurate throw would have had Bryant. Then Cingrani hit Miguel Montero to put runners at first and second. Cubs manager Joe Maddon opted against a sacrifice bunt. Starlin Castro lined Cingrani’s second pitch into short centerfield. Kris Bryant took home as Hamilton’s throw was cut off at the pitcher’s mound.

Steve grew up in Cincinnati as a die-hard fan of Sparky’s Big Red Machine. After 25 years living outside of Ohio, mostly in Ann Arbor, he returned to the Queen City in 2004. He has resumed a first-person love affair with the Cincinnati Reds and is a season ticket holder at Great American Ball Park. The only place to find Steve’s thoughts of more than 140 characters is Redleg Nation. Follow his tweets @spmancuso.

Join the conversation! 76 Comments

  1. Thanks for the recap Steve – don’t think sell mode can start fast enough – gets harder to watch every game , yet I still stick with them and always hope for the “smiling side of the scoreboard “

    • I just hope they do trade Chapman and Cueto and maximize return. If they can unload a Byrd or a few “vets”, that would be good, but Chapman and Cueto should both be top 4 or 5 trade targets and we should be able to get a small bidding war between a few teams. Key word is should…Jocketty has to be on his A game.

      • Both C and C will bring a couple of good MiLB prospects.

        It’s a crap shoot with MiLB prospects.

        • My thoughts exactly. The calls to get rid of any good Reds player have a certain logic, if one is able to overlook the obvious truth: Prospects are a virtually unknown quantity. On the other hand, it’s clear that rebuilding is called for, given the relative lack of excellent position players in the minors. It’s probably wise for any team to be constantly rebuilding, in fact, but the question is whether it’s wise to completely clean house. Trade Frazier? I expect that his value is high right now, but I ask myself what the chances are of getting anybody in return who is even nearly as good as he is, now or in the future. Cueto and Chapman may be unsignable by the Reds, and that would put them in a different category. But I have few illusions about what the Reds would get in return. A crapshoot, for sure.

        • They need to build around Frazier, not trade him. In my opinion, they should try this offseason to sign him to an extension, maybe 4-5 years and if they can’t do it, at the trade deadline next year start listening to offers. They will be saving plenty of money by having traded away Cueto, Leake, Chapman, and maybe even Bruce, put that money to good use and lock up another piece of the offense.

      • Chapman is not going anywhere until after the All Star game. They would be out of their mind to rush a Chapman trade and not have him in a Reds jersey to close out a NL win in Cincinnati. He’s under contract next year as well, a month longer won’t hurt his trade value. With Cueto, waiting might hurt his value though. The ideal situation in my mind is to package Cueto and Chapman together to get a huge return.

      • Anybody they don’t have to trade before the off season, they should hold onto until then because they will get more value in guys that are already MLB players or closer to being MLB ready than they will by trading them during the season.

        The this leaves Cueto and Leake. The new rules say that a team who trades for player during the season cannot that player a qualifying offer. Thus the player is a true renter with no possibility of turning him into a compensation choice. Given this, teams are offering less even for premium guys. There is a case to be made that the best strategy to follow with Cueto is to play out the string, make the qualifying offer and take the comp pick versus dumping him for several less than top drawer prospects. And what kind of talent might the Reds get in a comp pick? Lorenzen was 38th over all in the 2013 draft and he was a competitive balance pick made after the comp picks. As for Leake, he just might accept a QO, so they are probably best to move him now.

        • I disagree. Cueto may not bring a top 25 type.prospect, but he should bring two guys in the top 50-150 range, at least, and that is worth much more than a draft pick in the sandwich round.

          I also.disagree about waiting to trade guys until the off season. I think Chapman will bring a lot more back at the deadline than he would in the off season. The chance to have Chapman down the stretch and in the playoffs this year and all of next year is worth a lot more than just having him for a year. Relievers are always in high demand at the trade deadline and often teams overpay for them.

          The trade deadline this year could possibly be the most extreme sellers market in recent memory. The Reds would be fools not to cash in.

        • At this point “should” projections are just that, based on the previous system where teams could make a QO on the guy they acquired and recover a top 40 or so draft pick if they did not extend the guy. All the rumor talk and the fact that no major moves have happened to date indicate this is a new day; and folks are waiting for a major guy like Cueto to move to help set the market. In the end you could be right. At this point we just don’t know.

          In the Reds specific situation a lot depends on how one views their position. Are they looking to flood the mid and upper level minors with guys that are 2 or 3 years off or are they looking for 2 or 3 guys who are going to come directly onto the 25 MLB roster or at least to AAA as virtual locks to be on the 25 man MLB roster at the start of 2016?

          Personally I would hold Cueto for the comp pick unless i could get one guy who was going to be an immediate position starter or rotation pitcher (with at least 4 years of team control remaining) and at least one other guy who figured to make the big team next year.

  2. I second the thanks for the recap. The editors of this blog are incredibly dedicated to stay up so late and write a recap.

    • Agreed. I don’t think I could do it…unless the Reds were 104-58 or something.

  3. I thought Billy Hamilton was supposed to be the greatest defensive center fielder in all of baseball? If he has a noodle for an arm how can that be so? If he can’t throw worth a lick and can’t bat worth anything then why is he even playing?
    How does his weak arm show up in Dwar? If it doesn’t then his defensive isn’t truly covered by that stat.

    • The defensive metrics consider arm and range as two of the factors. Hamilton’s arm factor is negative this year. His range factor is hugely positive. Net, his defense is still strongly positive because of his range. His pluses in base running and defense outweigh the minus of his batting.

      http://www.fangraphs.com/statss.aspx?playerid=10199&position=OF

      • His arm this year is like -0.2. So right around average. Last year, they had his arm at 5.4 runs above average, the third best number among qualifying center fielders. Every scouting grade that I’ve seen on Hamilton ranks his arm as a 50 or 55, which is solid, major league average, arm. Also, he was drafted as a shortstop and there was never any discussion about moving him to second base because of his arm.

        Hamilton’s arm is just fine. It’s plenty strong, although not always accurate. But it is at least average , if not better, compared to most center fielders. Expecting him to have the arm of a right fielder or third baseman is not really fair.

    • He doesn’t have a noodle arm. He’s just not accurate with his throws. Same problem he had at shortstop. It’s not arm strength but arm accuracy that is the problem.

      I think classifying the Bryant double as taking advantage of Hamilton’s arm is a bit unfair. That was a line drive into the left center field gap. The only reason it didn’t go to the wall is because the grass looked kind of wet and thick, and it slowed the ball down, and because Billy is really fast and got there quick to cut it off. He then fired a strong throw back across his body, that was just a bit off line. But he almost had him.

      I’m not sure how many MLB centerfielders could make that play on a regular basis. Not many, I would imagine.

  4. I saw the 6th thru 9th innings, and Billy Hamilton’s arm would not be on my short list (or long list) of why the Reds lost.

    As far as the 9th inning goes, Tony Cingrani would seem to be more of a factor. He faces 3 batters, giving up 2 line drive hits sandwiched around hitting the other batter. I don’t know what “short CF” means in the case of Castro’s game winning hit. It was a hard hit ball, slightly to right center field. It was only short in the sense that Hamilton charged it.
    Kris Bryant, who scored from second, is fast. It was clear the game was over as soon as Castro hit the ball.

    • I don’t blame the loss on beham either. My point is that many make the argument that Billy’s defense makes up for his lack of offense. But does DWar consider his weak throwing arm being a liability as well?

      • I don’t know what “DWar” is but Hamilton had 10 OF assists last year and threw out 5 runners at the plate. He had .997 fielding average overall.

        This year, he has 4 assists and 1.000 fielding average so far.

    • Didn’t see the end but I’m sure Billy’s throw was very poor but Tony has to get outs – he didn’t.

  5. The Reds had several chances to take the lead after the Suarez HR tied it. If they manage to score 1 run, they probably win. In the 6th they have Votto at 2nd and Bruce on 1st with only 1 out. Grimm, the Cubs pitcher, depends mostly on a fastball and he wasn’t throwing it for strikes. Negron hits a ball hard to CF, out number 2.
    Then it’s Tucker Barnhart. Grimm throws him 3 straight curve balls well below the strike zone. Barnhart swings at all 3 without being close to making contact.

    Then in the 9th the Reds get a break. With 2 out and none on, Dominguez hits a routine ground ball to SS, but it hits a hole in the ground and takes a bad hop over Castro’s head. Then Hamilton, hitting against Jason Motte, has one of his best ABs of the season, working the count to 3-2, fouling off a pitch, then lining a single to CF. Dominguez takes 3rd, next Hamilton takes 2nd.

    At that point a little single puts the Reds ahead by 2 runs. Shumacker, batting in the leadoff spot, hits a weak ground ball to second to for the 3rd out.

    • I watched only as far as the rain delay. The Cubs telecast was all that was available to me, and the Cubs announcers mentioned that the Reds are last in all of MLB in RISP. I understand the flaws and shortcomings of RISP, indeed I do. Obviously, over time, good hitters hit well with RISP and poor hitters don’t. Nevertheless, games are not played over a long time (unless there are a lot of calls challenged, ha ha), they are played here and now, and it seems undeniable that this inability of the Reds is a factor in their disappointing season. I expect that its root is the generally poor plate discipline shown by much of the lineup, but it is a discrepancy unless the Reds also rank last in obp and batting average. It might be part of the reason they are so dependent upon home runs. I can’t explain the thing beyond the obvious: Pitchers probably bear down when runners are in scoring position, some hitters press or get overly defensive, but to write it off as nothing but random variation ignores what appears to be happening.

  6. The Reds were huge underdogs with that lineup. For one thing, Barnhart instead of Pena is a huge drop off. I mentioned above Barnhart’s swinging at 3 straight curve balls in the dirt or close. Then in the 9th, Motte pitched to him as if he were the opposing pitcher. Two fastballs right over the plate for two called strikes, then a swinging strike on the 3rd one.

    I know Pena can’t catch every game, but if he enters the game in the 6th after the rain delay and Leake’s departure, the Reds have a much better chance to win the game, by going ahead in either the 6th or the 9th. Last year Pena would enter a game as a bench player, and went 7 for 19 as a pinch hitter. This year he’s not used off the bench at all. No emergency catcher ? Why ? Negron can do everything else, teach him to catch a bit. The odds are very low that he’ll actually have to come into a game to catch.

    • Great points Pinson….agree.

    • Tucker is 24 and playing once or twice a week. Coming into June, he had been a league average hitter overall, and better than league average vs righties, which is the only pitchers he should be playing against. He is still hitting .250/.306/.455 vs righties. Plus, he is better than Pena at every other aspect of the game besides hitting.

      He has had two bad games in a row at the plate. Doesn’t mean he is horrible. And Pena is not going to keep hitting .300. He started out like this last year, but by the end of the year he was around .250 with an OBP under .300 and a WAR that was below replacement level. I like Pena, but he seems to be vastly overrated by the fan base.

  7. More of a rant about the lineup. Without Pena and BP, it’s going to be weak. So you pick that game to give DeJesus a “rest” and put Schumaker in LF, batting lead off ? Or can Price actually think that Schumaker is a better player than DeJesus ? One loud boo.

    • Schu should start any games…ever. Sad. I’d rather waive him and call up Winker or Irvin or someone and give tjhem some valuable ABs.

      • Winker? Having a subpar season in AA. Terrible idea.

        • I understand that Winker isn’t having the year we’d hoped for, or he’d hoped for (yet). But subpar is kind of harsh unless you’re only looking at batting average and not considering park factors when it comes to SLG%. Currently he’s hitting 250/356/365/720 with a 108 wRC+ (so he’s actually 8% better than average). His BABiP is .285 which is below his career average. Outside of 21 (injured) games in AA the year before he’s never had a BABiP lower than .308. The BB% is very good 12.9% and the K rate is solid at 14.2%. Those are the things that carry forward for hitters. Pensacola (his home park) is notorious for sapping power to RF. As a lefty this effects Winker, and he’s admitted such in an interview. As a 21 year old in AA, it’s far too early and off base to say he’s having a subpar season.

        • Not that I’m advocating calling up Winker, but just wanted to note that after a pretty dismal April/May, he’s looking like the hitter we expected in June thus far. .326/.396/.535/.931 Stephenson has made a very similar turnaround this year as well, hopefully both will continue their recent successes and be in Louisville by years end.

        • Winker needs AB in AA and AAA before he faces MLB pitching.

          Mid 2016 maybe. Mid 2015 would be a bad idea.

        • Other than the comment above (that also mentioned Ervin, so that should indicate the amount of salt to take with the comment), I don’t think anyone is realistically advocating for Winker to be brought up now. But, it’s also not out of the realm of possibilities that he ends this year in AAA and is ready by early next year. He may need more time, but it’s not uncommon for players to go from AA to MLB with little to no time at AAA in between. Especially for top prospects. Winker has an advanced hit-tool and plate discipline which makes it easier to believe that he could find success at the MLB early on.

        • Reggie Sanders came straight to the Reds from AA. So did Pete Rose in 1963.

          Winker does not seem to be ready for MLB pitching yet. A year away (maybe).

          Ervin (maybe) in 2017.

        • If Winker hits anywhere close to what he is now for the remainder of the MiLB season, he’ll be in AAA before the end of July, playing in Cincy in Sept., and probably the Opening day LF next season.

        • Winker maybe in AAA by end of 2015. Starts out there (AAA) in 2016. Maybe ready by June next summer.

    • Pinson, I’m not a Skip fan as much as anyone else around here, but he did get on base 4 times the game before and also blistered 2 balls in his first 2 AB’s, that the defense made heroic stops on.

  8. I think Cingrani’s strategy is to force the Reds to start him by proving he is not good enough to be a major league reliever.

    I started out a bit sympathetic for him, given how stupid the Reds were to put Jason “De Sade” Marquis in the rotation. But his sulking and pouting becomes more tiresome with every failed appearance.

    • I’ve been a big Cingrani fan but I agree with you. His attitude has been awful and his performance hasn’t been much better. I wouldn’t be surprised if they tried to deal him as well.

  9. Fay’s article says the Reds are 10-5 since the 9 game losing streak, with 4 of the losses coming from bullpen meltdowns. Can you imagine if the Reds had actually gone 14 – 1? The outlook would certainly be different.

    • The Reds have been playing well sans the bullpen. This team needs a couple, or three, arms right now and, I believe, they could be competitive for a wildcard.

    • But the crappy bullpen, along with the pathetic bench and lack of depth, is a big part of why most people thought this team wouldn’t compete. Going into the season, the Reds top ten players could match anybody. I mean, Votto, Frazier, Cueto, Mes, Chapman, Bailey, Phillips, Bruce, Leake, and Cozart is a nice core of players. But after that, you have Hamilton, a couple rookie pitchers that have potential but are probably not fully ready, and then a bunch of replacement level or below type players.

  10. It appears that Cingrani pours gasoline on the fire more often than not. He has a straight, hittable fastball. He has no other pitches. He can’t throw strikes and he is a head case. Clearly not much to like here.

  11. Cingrani lost the game not Hamilton.

  12. It’s time to send Billy to AAA. He’s just not cutting it. Those who would argue his defense is offsetting his putrid offense are making the same argument from a few years back for Drew Stubbs. To paraphrase that debate all over, the takeaway on Stubbs was that he wasn’t worth keeping out there for those 2-3 balls per week that an average center fielder might not get to. The same applies here. We can’t be sacrificing 30 at-bats per week just to catch a couple gap shots. Billy’s OBP is below .270. If that’s the bar, then ANYONE in our minor league system would be an upgrade. Just kidding, but only kind of.

    After a slow start, Yorman is OPS’ing over .900 in May AND June. He’s an athletic defender. At this point, I don’t see any downside to giving him a chance.

    • Agree that Billy needs to improve his offense. But dismissing 2 or 3 gap shots a week may well be dismissing 2 or 3 wins. Probably not, because those events don’t always occur when the game is on the line, but you get my point.

    • I’m seeing Rodriguez with a .919 June OPS, but a .578 April, and a .754 May. I wouldn’t be against giving him a shot given Hamilton hasn’t hit above AA yet, but let’s be real, Yorman is going to K about one third of the time and have a Hamiltonesque (sub .270) OBP. We really have no CF alternatives since Jocketty doesn’t understand depth or bench strength.

    • Billy’s defense is much, much better than Stubbs though. For his career, in center field, Stubbs has -3 defensive runs saved. Hamilton already has +19. UZR/150, a defensive rate stat, has Hamilton at 24.2 and Stubbs at 1.4. It’s a really big difference.

      But as far as Stubbs goes, he was great in 2010 and pretty good in 2011. The only year where there could even be a debate about taking him out of the lineup was 2012, and I don’t think Heisey would have been much better. The big mistake with Stubbs was batting him at the top of the lineup, especially against right handed pitching.

  13. Enough of the fancypants stuff, Joey. 2 more plays last night where a solid, fundamental approach would’ve done the job more easily than his method. Please, JUST STOP!!!

  14. Young, hot team, new manager, new(er) ballpark… ESPN will blow so much smoke up Chicago’s little behinds that Wrigley will have the visibility of a fog storm. Coupled with the fact that it’s 1) on national television, 2) on Sunday, and 3) the Reds, I guarantee another loss tonight.

  15. If I was GM of this team, first of all, I would put Meso on the 60 day DL and have the surgery scheduled. This is a lost season so let’s do something smart for a change. It appears that Mr. Jocketty is already listening to offers on Chapman. Let’s get him moved for some position players. I would not worry about the All-Star game because a player is always one pitch from being injured. Preferably an “almost major league ready” top prospect, a decent prospect, and a couple of Single A prospects. Next Cueto needs to go for the same package. With his history of injuries, we need to make this move quickly if possible. If not, he will become more valuable as the trade deadline gets closer if he remains healthy. I would really look hard at moving Jay Bruce for the same package of prospects. He has to be one of the streakiest hitters that I have ever seen. We need more consistency in right field from an offensive standpoint. A change of scenery might do him good. The next move that I would make is to try to package Brandon Phillips to a team that believes they are a middle infielder from the Series. Based on salary, he is not going to bring much but it would certainly bring payroll relief for the next several seasons. If they cannot move him, I would put him on the waiver wire and see if anyone wants to pick up his salary. However if that turf toe continues to plague him that will not be an option. Marlon Byrd will probably not be back long enough to draw any interest by July 30 but he might draw interest for a waiver wire deal. His salary would prevent many clubs from considering him. I would also consider trading Cingrani. To be, he seems to be “hard to coach” and he appears to be very temperamental. He obviously does not want to be a relief pitcher so the Reds need to define a role for him for 2016 right now. If he does not want to be a relief pitcher, trade him. Sign Todd Frazier with the money saved from the Phillips deal. However I would not go more than five years. I would then fast track Stephenson to the big leagues and let him get a taste of the show with the idea that he will be pitching in Cincinnati in 2016. If we get rid of Byrd, let’s bring up Yorman Rodriguez with an eye on September when we bring up Winker.

    • Adam Dunn. Many said much the same things in 2004. Reds traded him to Arizona for 3 guys.

      Can you name any of them? Dunn hit 462 HR in his MLB career and still had 10 years of pop in his bat when the Reds traded him.

      The Reds WILL NOT GET any MLB ready-to-go players in mid season for anyone ether hope to trade.

      • This is just ridiculous. Adam Dunn didn’t have ten years of pop left. After they traded him, he had 2 more good years with the Nats and one decent year, and 2 terrible years, with the White Sox.

        Second, you are completely ignoring, or you don’t understand, the contract situations when discussing trades. Dunn was going to be a free agent at the end of the 2008 year. The Reds only had him for two more months. How much should two months of Adam Dunn be worth? They got Micah Owings who was a decent young pitcher with a little potential.

        Third, Adam Dunn could not continue to play left field. He was going to have to move to first base. The Reds had a decent young first baseman named Votto, though. Are you saying they should have signed Dunn to an extension and benched, or traded, Votto? I hope not.

        And finally, Cueto and Chapman are much more valuable than Adam Dunn was in 2008. Sure, prospects often don’t work out. But a decent percentage of the top100 types become solid big league players, and a few become stars. And the only way the Reds can compete is by having a steady supply of homegrown talent. So, they need to stock up on prospects because some will bust.

        • Thank you. It’s really getting ridiculous how some Reds fans are constantly claiming none of our players are worth anything. Just look at what people like Kiley McDaniel (WHO HAS WORKED IN MAJOR LEAGUE FRONT OFFICES) is saying our guys are worth. I’ve never seen a fan base as willfully ignorant as Reds fans are at times.

      • Yep – Micah Owings, who was quite a hitting pitcher.

  16. The Reds, and for that matter the Bengals also, usually fail to show up for national TV.

  17. 06/10/15 Cincinnati Reds released RHP Jason Marquis.

    This is the pitcher who bumped Cingrani from the starting rotation to the bullpen. Now Marquis is gone and Cingrani is still in the bullpen (or doghouse). The Reds drafted Cingrani as a starting pitcher who had no college success as a starting pitcher and only 1 pitch. Cingrani mowed through the minor leagues as a starter with only 1 pitch and had tremendous success as a rookie with only 1 pitch. Cingrani still has only 1 pitch and that doesn’t fly at the major league level.

    Along with Hamilton, Cingrani needs a trip to AAA to develop and prove he has at least a second, and preferably third, pitch before returning to the major league level. The alternative is to trade Cingrani prior to the deadline.

    • Not so. Cingrani was told he would P in bullpen long before Reds signed Marquis.

      • Really? About halfway through spring training, I thought it was announced that Cingrani was being moved to the bullpen. Which pretty much sealed Marquis’ spot in the rotation.

  18. Ken Rosenthal claims that the Reds’ baseball operations department understands the need and wants to begin pulling the trigger on trades to move Cueto, Chapman and Bruce, but Bob Castellini is blocking any and all such consideration.

    • Lord have mercy. I don’t know which is worse. An owner who doesn’t really care or an owner who cares so much that he tries to run the team and make all the decisions. It’s just so frustrating. Why hire baseball people if you aren’t going to listen to them?

      Amazing to think that in December 2012, less than 3 years ago, the Reds were Baseball America’s organization of the year.

    • Bruce too? That is a little surprising, but then not surprising too.
      Maybe Big Bob just has too big of a heart. Not good for a baseball team in need of transition.

    • More like that he just needed to be persuaded.

    • And there you have it – he is the root of the problem – mainly for signing do nothing Jocketty for additional years –

    • If MrC is refusing talk about moves that is one thing. If he is rejecting specific moves because he doesn’t like the return, that might be another.

    • Maybe that Leake/Bruce to SD for Wil Myers and a young P is gaining steam. Myers has to come off the DL first.
      I think BHam could be added to a Cueto or Chapman deal for a team in need of a CF too. Toronto? LA Dodgers? They could move Pederson to a corner OF spot. Seattle? Cueto, Chapman and BHam all together in a mega-deal?
      The Reds have had the worst OF two years going now. Re-vamp it with a vengeance.

  19. In the interest of equal time, while we all (myself included) have been criticizing the bench and lack of depth in the minors, this team has won 10 of 15 and but for several pen meltdowns could have been 12-3 or even 14-1 while playing with the bottom end of the 40 man roster at several positions not to mention 3 or 4 rookie rotation pitchers. Yes the competition hasn’t been top drawer but still it says something.

    If one believes the rookie pitchers are for real over time, perhaps the fire sale needs to limited and very focused versus backing up the truck and hauling away everybody.

    • And I’ll immediately temper my previous remarks by adding that unfortunately due to the nature of their injuries, I don’t think Meso, or Cozazrt or Bailey should be counted on for anything in the future until we see them doing it in competition. And that has to be factored into the trading posture.

    • Trade: Cueto, Chappy, Leake, Bruce, BP. Keep Frazier unless wowed by an offer.

  20. Throw $#@$ strikes, Cingrani. You’ll never amount to much if you can’t get ahead in the count. It’s amazing at how much his performance has declined since 2013.

    • The only players they must trade now are Cueto and Leake, I would wait on Chapman, Bruce, Phillips until winter when all the MLB teams can make offers. It is possible some team may make an offer the Reds can’t refuse on Chapman this summer. Bruce can’t continue to be this bad or can he? Trade him to the Yankees and he will probably become the reincarnation of Paul O’Neill.

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About Steve Mancuso

Steve grew up in Cincinnati as a die-hard fan of Sparky's Big Red Machine. After 25 years living outside of Ohio, mostly in Ann Arbor, he returned to the Queen City in 2004. He has resumed a first-person love affair with the Cincinnati Reds and is a season ticket holder at Great American Ball Park. The only place to find Steve's thoughts of more than 140 characters is Redleg Nation. Follow his tweets @spmancuso.

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