It is, according to Forbes magazine. Short but interesting article that shows the dominance of the Cincinnati Reds in the early part of the ’70’s.

Both the ’73 and ’70 Reds make their list.

I’ve been a Reds fan since the late ’60’s, with my luck of being able to attend plenty of games at Riverfront during the BRM era. I was sitting in the Green Seats in the OF when Pete came home in ’84 and was in the Red seats when Glenn Braggs reached over the fence in ’90 to beat the Pirates. I have had many favorites from Jim Maloney to Johnny Bench, Barry Larkin, Adam Dunn, and Jay Bruce.

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  1. This is an excellent analysis of the ’73 Reds. The one argument against the ’73 Reds is that they did not even make it to the WS.

    I suffered thru their loss to a mediocre Reds team, I lived in NYC at the time, where most people just assumed the Mets would win. I attended game 4, which Pete Rose won with a HR in the 12th inning.

    The Reds were done in by 2 things. One was that the Mets had 3 outstanding starters – Seaver, Koosman, and Matlack – and an outstanding reliever, Tug (“You gotta believe”) McGraw. In a short (best of 5 series), those 4 pitched a whole lot of innings.

    Also the format was unfair. Home field advantage was not based on the best record. The first 2 games were in Cincy, then the final 3 in NY. After the Reds were shut out by Matlack in Game 2, they were already in trouble.

  2. Leave it to Larussa to make Rhodes the bad guy. Sorry Arthur, but I can’t wait to see you blow a world series save.

  3. ’72 Reds were pretty good too!
    Lost World Series 4-3
    6 one-run ballgames in that World Series! That has to be the record, no?

  4. I wish Hamilton had crushed a 3-run jack there.

  5. @Myles: Sparky Anderson said the 1972 WS was better played and more exciting than the 1975 WS, even though the Reds lost.

  6. @Myles: Hamilton said later we was just putting an easy swing on the ball, to go for the sac fly. That made sense. Once he hit it, I knew the Rangers would win, as Young was also going to at the least hit a sac fly.

    The Rangers have a very good lineup.

  7. The loss of Dave Concepcion right before the All Star break really hurt them in the post season. He was having a breakout year and killed left handed pitching.

    • The loss of Dave Concepcion right before the All Star break really hurt them in the post season. He was having a breakout year and killed left handed pitching.

      Absolutely. They missed that RHed bat big time.

      • Absolutely. They missed that RHed bat big time.

        yes, completely agree, DC was big loss. I remember as a kid watching that series totaly stunned the Reds losing it. I did not understand back then like I do today just how top heavy the reds lineup was. After concepcion was hurt, Reds ended up playing significantly 4 guys the aggregate batting avg was around .200, not good in any era(Chaney .181, Menke .191, Tolan .206, Geronimo .210) Outside of the Big 4 hitters, only Driessen was really of any help offensively at .301 his rookie year. Also a year Reds had a pretty good starting rotation.

  8. Not good leaving St. Loo down 0-2. Now it’s home and all even facing Lohse. If the Rangers are going to win, Hamilton needs to get hot.

  9. @JCTENRED: Absolutely, I almost mentioned that. The Reds missed Concepcion in a major way against the Mets. Chaney was a steep dropoff. And Matlack, Koosman, and McGraw were all tough lefties. Joe Morgan did not like facing the Mets, saying that their lefties would gang up on him.

  10. @Redsfanx: Hamilton can’t go 0 for whatever from here, but I don’t agree that he has to get hot. He probably won’t, his groin hurts. The Rangers have a deep lineup and a better team than the Cardinals.

  11. 1962 Dodgers. Basically a perfect team (that didn’t even make it to the World Series). Except Koufax got hurt and missed 1/3 of the year and they still won 100+ games.

  12. Strength of 1962 schedule (expansion year) counts against the 62 Dodgers’ rating. They were 16-2 against the Mets and 12-6 against the Astros that year.

    Some of Bill James’s studies indicate that while long term effects of expansion are negligible on stats, the year of expansion lends itself to wider array of records and greater chances of individual records being broken (i.e., Roger Maris’s 61 home runs in 1961 AL expansion season).

  13. @per14: I remember the ’62 Dodgers, blowing a 4 game lead by losing 6 out of their last 7 in the 162 game schedule. Then they lost 2 out of 3 to the Giants in the playoffs. A career year for Tommy Davis.

  14. @Steve Price: Yes in 1961 6 AL players hit more than 40 HRs, unheard of at the time. And in 1962, Frank Robinson had his best season for the Reds, Tommy Davis had a career year, lots of other career years I’m sure for hitters with the diluted pitching.

  15. @pinson343: Dodgers lost 2 out of 3 to the Giants in a playoff series after they both were at 101-61 after 162 games.
    The Reds were 98-64 that season.

  16. Theo Epstein will be the President of Cubs baseball operations, he’s bringing in someone else to be the GM. I say that here as this is where comments are being posted.

    • Theo Epstein will be the President of Cubs baseball operations, he’s bringing in someone else to be the GM. I say that here as this is where comments are being posted.

      Maybe the Cubs will break their long curse, too?
      Epstein did a good job in Boston.
      The Cubs have a semi-infinite budget compared to the division.

  17. @doctor: Yes and Driessen was a disaster at 3rd base, in particular in Game 5. He never played 3rd base again.

  18. The true answer is probably the 1906 Cubs. Check out this run differential: 704-381.

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About Bill Lack

I've been a Reds fan since the late '60's, with my luck of being able to attend plenty of games at Riverfront during the BRM era. I was sitting in the Green Seats in the OF when Pete came home in '84 and was in the Red seats when Glenn Braggs reached over the fence in '90 to beat the Pirates. I have had many favorites from Jim Maloney to Johnny Bench, Barry Larkin, Adam Dunn, and Jay Bruce.

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Baseball - General, Big Red Machine