Defending Adam Dunn

On Adam Dunn

I have received more criticism in the seven seasons Redleg Nation has been in business over my undying loyalty to Adam Dunn than any other topic. Many of you will choose to ignore this post; another significant portion of you may choose to follow the link for its schadenfreude value.

Anyway, I really enjoyed this post examining the rough year Dunn is having and how it can be fixed.

12 thoughts on “On Adam Dunn

  1. I want to go on record as saying that I have always joined you in your staunch support of AD.

  2. No player is perfect, and lord knows Dunn has had imperfect moments. He’s having a historically bad season, that however does not wipe his prior accomplishments off the board, they still were some fine seasons.

  3. I couldn’t disagree more with the swing analysis in the article as I don’t believe it has anything to do with his struggles. Dunn has employed a similar version of that bat waggle for the last couple productive seasons. Instead, I believe it’s a combination of factors that have caused his season to spiral out of control. Much like Paul Konerko’s horrible 2007 season, these things tend to snowball, and only the season ending can stop it. Dunn has admitted the following to the press (I live in the Chicago area):
    1. He never picks up a bat until spring training.
    2. He said he needs to be in better shape.
    Combine those two factors with having to learn a new league, get accustomed to sitting on the bench DH’ing exclusively, throw in an emergency appendectomy, and this is what you get.

  4. Article’s blocked here at work, so I can’t make any intelligent comment on it, or on Dunn’s struggles this year. Therefore, I will simply make the same two statements I make every time his name cones up in a conversation.

    1) He should have been playing 1B. In Dayton, from day one. Being slow and striking out a ton doesn’t seem to bug folks when it’s Ryan Howard.

    2) The fact that they could not find a good use for a guy who got on base 4 times out of 10 was a failure of imagination on the part of the entire organization.

    • Article’s blocked here at work, so I can’t make any intelligent comment on it, or on Dunn’s struggles this year. Therefore, I will simply make the same two statements I make every time his name cones up in a conversation. 1) He should have been playing 1B. In Dayton, from day one. Being slow and striking out a ton doesn’t seem to bug folks when it’s Ryan Howard.2) The fact that they could not find a good use for a guy who got on base 4 times out of 10 was a failure of imagination on the part of the entire organization.

      Had they put Dunn at first wonder how that would have changed the teams thinking when drafting Votto, and I think people felt that Dunn should have done more then just get on base.

  5. Mark Simon made a really interesting observation about Dunn’s season that I found fascinating.

    I can’t listen to the podcast again right now to get the exact numbers, but essentially…against fastballs that are 93mph or harder, Dunn has actually done well…but against fastballs SLOWER than that threshold, Dunn’s numbers are far, far, far below league average. How one would even begin to explain that…I have no idea.

    I’ll try to dig up the splits and get the specific numbers at some point later on today.

  6. Well conjecture’s always fun, so who can say? Having Votto didn’t stop the org from drafting Alonso. And maybe if Dunner was at first, Votto would be our current MVP left fielder… who knows?

    And I’d argue that he did do more than just get on base – 40 HRs and 100 or so RBIs more a year.

  7. @RC: …..The fact that they could not find a good use for a guy who got on base 4 times out of 10 was a failure of imagination on the part of the entire organization….

    And while most of the personalities have changed, they seem to be well onto the same road with Alonso. At least the guy blocking him at his primary position is a top OBP and OPS guy himself.

  8. @Annalise: Only half in jest, he only swings at one speed and that is fast. It might be interesting to see if the guys who are capable consciously show him above 93MPH out of the hitting zone then come back a little slower in the hitting zone.

    The Ol’ lefthander used to talk a lot about how “taking just a little off” (a fastball) was often more effective than trying to “reach back back for a little extra”.

  9. @Greg Dafler:

    I agree with this. It happened fairly early in the season. Had he not needed it, he probably would have gotten back on track in May. I had an appendectomy at 20 and back then I was into fencing. Even at that age I had to take a month off. It is a shock to the system.

    It would not have mattered if Dunn played 1B when Votto came up. Jocketty would have been just as determined to get rid of Dunn at that time. What annoys me most now about that trade was that Jocketty pretty much gave up on all the players he got for him after just a couple years. Granted, Owings was not consistent and DAllas Buck has been injured. But Wil Castillo could have been a valuable utility man. A player who can play catcher in addition to several other positions is rare and very useful in an emergency

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