2010 Reds

Reds got a big boost in attendance in ’10

From the Cincinnati Business Courier:

Sure, there were still a few September games that featured swaths of empty seats. But the Reds wound up posting a whopping 17.9 percent increase in attendance. That was the second biggest increase in Major League Baseball. Only the Minnesota Twins, who moved into a new ballpark this year, churned out a bigger improvement.

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The Reds just got over the 2 million mark, selling 2.06 million tickets. That’s an average of 25,439 per game.

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The really good news? Owner Bob Castellini has said he’ll plow profits back into the team. So more fans means more money to improve the club, re-sign players, improve scouting and generally shoot for putting a consistently winning product on the field year after year.

If the theory holds true that attendance really takes the big jump the year after a team unexpectedly contends, the Reds should be in good shape for 2011 attendance-wise.

12 thoughts on “Reds got a big boost in attendance in ’10

  1. My expectation:

    Opening day: obvious sell out

    I also think that fans won’t come out in droves for the first few games, but will wait to see if we start winning again. If we win (I mean something like 10-5, may be even 9-6, to start the season), fans will begin to come, especially by all-star time.

    If we start the season losing, fans won’t show until well into the season again, even if we have a winning record.

    The slow start in attendance will be the penalty for the poor fall playoff showing.

    After the Braves swept us in the 1995 playoffs and we only scored five runs in four games, average attendance per game actually dropped by 3000 per game. We had started the season 8-5 and then lost eight of the next nine.

    • I also think that fans won’t come out in droves for the first few games, but will wait to see if we start winning again.If we win (I mean something like 10-5, may be even 9-6, to start the season), fans will begin to come, especially by all-star time.If we start the season losing, fans won’t show until well into the season again, even if we have a winning record.The slow start in attendance will be the penalty for the poor fall playoff showing.

      It will all hinge on season-ticket sales. When we see something like 12,000 for a weekday game in April, the vast majority of that is season tickets. And a lot of THOSE people don’t even show up, which is why it looks like a lot less than 10,000.

      Anyway, the season tickets will create the baseline — and I think there is good reason to believe the season-ticket sales will be up quite a bit for 2011. Hopefully by a few thousand!

  2. It also coincides with the recent rise in regional TV coverage, which can be good in keeping fans “tuned in” to the team, but can also keep some fans from feeling they have to show up.

    Sadly, I didn’t make it down from Indy for the second year in a row (although I did have NLCS game 1 tickets 😳 ). Hopefully I’ll get there once or twice next year, preferably for a weekday afternoon game that isn’t televised.

  3. I wouldn’t be surprised if season tickets sales go up substantially…I know a couple small business owners who previously had weekend season tickets (that were once full season tickets) that are both switching back to the full season tickets. I have no idea this is counted in any calculation. Also, myself and some friends are coming together to buy the full ticket package. I can’t imagine this is out of the ordinary.

    Regarding the attendance, one of the many reasons I’m not sold on Chapman starting in AAA is that the Reds will want people buying tickets to his games. I for one will not be that surprised if Chapman is magically the #3 or #4 pitcher and pitches that Tuesday or Wednesday game against the Astros the first week of the season.

    • I wouldn’t be surprised if season tickets sales go up substantially…I know a couple small business owners who previously had weekend season tickets (that were once full season tickets) that are both switching back to the full season tickets.

      While this may well be true, I think we’re to see a huge boost in flex-pack sales, like those “Baker’s Dozen” type of deals. Those make you eligible to buy playoff tickets while costing a lot less than a full season package. But every little bit helps, right?

  4. That’s great to see, especially after all the bitching and moaning that went on about September attendance.

  5. Yeah I wonder if all the bandwagon whiners who were ladling scorn on Cincinnati fans in September will be back to admit they were wrong?

  6. Great news all the way around. It was a great season and should pay dividends into the future.

    Go Reds 2011!

  7. I can’t count how many people I know who were SEASON TICKET HOLDERS throughout the beginning of this dreadful decade but obviously cancelled their seats a few years later, around 2005-06. It’s going to take another solid year before enough of those people come back to the fold and rejoin the group season ticket bandwagon.

  8. I believe that if they really want to boost the attendance that they need to realize the regional nature of their market and start aggressively working it.

    Look at the population in the 60 and 90 minute drive radii. Cincinnati, Dayton and the areas between are now functionally one market. The same holds true for Northern Ky. Significant portions of the Columbus and Indy sprawls are within the 90 minute (drive) market. It is only a “small market” team if chooses to see itself as one and act like one in its marketing.

    One suggestion I would make is that they need to get away from the 7:10 start time, at least for the portion of the season between Memorial Day and Labor Day. As all too many folks have experienced firsthand, this is no longer a manufacturing driven region. The day shift doesn’t end at 2:30 or 3:00 or even 4:00 anymore for the masses. Push the starting time back at least 30 minutes in recognition of this.

  9. If you start games at 7:40, you’re effectively eliminating large parts of that region you’re trying to market to. It becomes a problem if fans in Indy and Columbus can’t get home until after midnight.

    The Reds now have a decent TV presence in Indy — about half the FS Ohio games are simulcast on FS Indiana (although I watch them all on FS Ohio on DirecTV anyway). The Winter Caravan also stops here, but it has very little local publicity.

  10. @renbutler: Understand the late arrival home issue; it is the other side of the coin of being a regional team. I just think you are more likely to get carloads coming from work along I-71, I-74, I-75 north of Dayton etc with a later start time that gets them there for the the start of the game. Lots of folks leave early anyway.

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