06/30/2007

On Ricky Stone

So Ricky Stone was called up yesterday, as Victor Santos was designated for assignment. I remember how crappy Stone was for the Reds in 2005 (6.75 ERA, anyone?), but I hadn’t realized that he actually retired last year.

Yes, Stone has done well for Louisville this season, but I hope no one expects him to help the bullpen blues.

Blame Chad for creating this mess.

Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, “The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds” is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad’s musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine.

You can email Chad at chaddotson@redlegnation.com.

Join the conversation! 13 Comments

  1. This makes zero sense. Even if Stone is somehow good the rest of this season (possible but not likely), he’s not a long-term solution and won’t be part of the next good Reds team (which, like the evening sun, is sinking further and further below the horizon).

    We’re going to lose a hundred freakin’ games for the second time in franchise history. Isn’t it time to see if the youngsters in the system can provide an answer for the future? Where’s Medlock or Dumatrait?

    Oh, well. The Tour begins next Saturday. That will divert me from this horror for a month.

  2. Wayne Krivsky’s bullpen plan:
    Throw as much crap as you can at the wall, pray that something sticks and keep it.

  3. Hmmmm. And what’s the operative word in that sentence, doug?

    It’s kind of amazing given the volume thrown at the wall, that none of it has stuck. Meanwhile, Ryan Franklin has a 1.42 ERA in STL.

  4. At least Jim Bowden provided some excitement in contrast to the mute Krivsky/Castellini team and Narron’s platitudes after every late-inning blown game. How about a little emotion, ie. Sweet Lou, instead of Mr. Low Key Nice Guy.

  5. The recent performances of these rookie pitchers from the minors everyone is always trumpeting is fair evidence that perhaps they weren’t ready after all.

  6. The recent performances of these rookie pitchers from the minors everyone is always trumpeting is fair evidence that perhaps they weren’t ready after all.

    I think if the Reds are patient, Marcus McBeth could turn into something useful. In 9IP (yeah, yeah, small sample size) he’s struck out 7 and walked only 2. His ISO is 0.91. His BABIP is .385, so he’s been pretty unlucky (and pitches in front of a defense that’s one of the worst in the majors in turning balls in play into outs).

    If Coutlangus could stop walking people, especially LHBs, the rest of his peripherals are OK. The same can be said for Salmon.

    With Livingston, Dumatrait, Burton and Medlock at AAA, the potential is there to put together a decent pen. Livingston and probably Dumatrait should also be looked at eventually as rotation candidates, although I think Dumatrait’s future is in the pen at the big league level.

    The problem is usage, and that’s on Jerry (and Hume). At this point I’m not sure how much I can blame him, but he rides anyone who has the mildest success into the ground and then looks for his next abuse candidate.

    Of courser, the other part of the run prevention equation is the defense. I’m not sure how much improvement we can expect when our two best run producers are our two biggest defensive liabilities. One of those guys really needs to go to the AL. And I’m afraid Krivsky is going to send the wrong guy.

  7. Can someone please instill in these relievers what to do when they have two strikes on a hitter and what they have to do when there are two out in an inning? It’s called killer instinct and it is what these relievers lack!

  8. Marcus McBeth has a defensive independant ERA of 2.50 and a real life ERA of 7.00. The guy has been incredibly unlucky.

    I also find it strange that the Reds bullpen coach, Tom Hume said on tv the other day that the Reds were teaching their guys to throw softer in order to have a little bit more control.

    Yes, throw softer is the Reds ideology for pitching. No wonder our bullpen sucks.

  9. The guy has been incredibly unlucky.

    Well, yeah, he pitches for us, doesn’t he? 😯 (Sorry, gallows humor is all I’ve got left.)

  10. Tom Hume said on tv the other day that the Reds were teaching their guys to throw softer in order to have a little bit more control

    Wow. With a mentality like that, it’s no wonder they suck! What a joke.

  11. We should all just relax with the knowledge that Krivsky is following through on his grand vision under secrecy not known since the Manhattan Project.

    He’d tell us, but we wouldn’t understand. πŸ™„

  12. Tom Hume said on tv the other day that the Reds were teaching their guys to throw softer in order to have a little bit more control.

    As an across-the-board policy, it’s not a good idea. But it might work for someone like John Coutlangus. They flashed a stat a couple of games back that showed lefties are hitting around .180 off him. Unfortunately he’s walked 11 left-handed batters. A southpaw can get away with soft tossing if he’s got both the stuff and good control. Look at Moyer. His fastball couldn’t break a window pane.

  13. The Bottom feeding continues.

Comments are closed.

About Chad Dotson

Blame Chad for creating this mess. Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, "The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds" is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad's musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine. You can email Chad at chaddotson@redlegnation.com.

Category

2007 Reds, Reds - General