Once again, A’s GM Billy Beane sat down for an interview with Athletics Nation.

What are the chances of getting Reds GM Dan O’Brien to sit down for an interview with Redleg Nation? Zero?

Blame Chad for creating this mess.

Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, “The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds” is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad’s musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine.

You can email Chad at chaddotson@redlegnation.com.

Join the conversation! 5 Comments

  1. I thought this was an interesting comment on the importance of winning in the minor leagues:

    Blez: Talk about the A’s minor league clubs for a few minutes. The Rockhounds wound up Texas League champs. The Sacramento team ran away with the division and made the playoffs again. Stockton also had a great first season as an affiliate. How important is winning as a part of the organization in your estimation?

    Beane: It’s huge. It’s something we demand. Keith (Lieppman) demands it. Winning is a habit, in my opinion. And losing is a habit. Our philosophy is that this is a team game. The one statistic shows it’s a team game is team wins. If you emphasize just purely individual development, I think in many cases what you’re doing is creating a situation where a player might know he’s the one prospect on the team and when he gets here, that mentality is established that it’s about me and not about the team. I think there is something to say about guys even being in minor league playoffs. You know, having them in situations where doing things to help the team are important. It was something I learned coming up with the New York Mets in the 80s. Those minor league teams won everywhere. So when most of those guys got to the major leagues the expectation was they were going to win there. Now whether it’s true or not, I don’t know, that’s my only guide of reference. But it was something that I felt was important when I got in the GM office. We tried to carry it over the last decade and I think it has had an impact. You take a guy like Eric Chavez. The worst year Eric has ever had in the big leagues is 87 wins. That’s saying something because Eric came up in a minor league system that won. He demands a lot of himself, but he also demands a lot of the team. It’s nice to know that after 88 wins last year, that’s a disappointment because the guys are used to playing into October or in the minor leagues, September. I do think it creates a positive mentality and feeling throughout the organization. Every win you get always makes you feel good and I do think it’s contagious.

  2. This shows how wrong some people are about Beane’s “moneyball” strategy. Beane is about winning and exploiting market inefficiencies to locate undervalued players – not just signing fat guys who can draw walks. We should be so fortunate to have such a creative GM.

  3. We should be so fortunate to have such a creative GM.Once upon a time we did, Bob Howsam was the Beane of his time, plus he could market baseball like Walt Disney could market mice.

    Bob like the 4 GM’s before him worked for one time with Branch Rickey, the Billy Beane of the Model T era.

  4. Bob Howsam didn’t really get Moneyball-type players and Sparky didn’t really manage the Moneyball way. Back then Moneyball wasn’t necessary because owners still ruled the game.

    Branch Richey was probably the anti-Billy Beane since his teams scratched and clawed for runs. Billy Beane would have had a cow when Enos Slaughter scored from 1B on a single.

  5. Branch Richey was probably the anti-Billy Beane since his teams scratched and clawed for runs. Billy Beane would have had a cow when Enos Slaughter scored from 1B on a single

    Branch Rickey exploited the marketplace, invented the Farm System and introduced the concept of on base percentage and isolated powwer to basbeall. Changing the ruls with your noggin is what the book Moneyball is about.

    Branch Rickey would have loved Billy Beane.

    Just like he loved Bob Howsam who did GM much like Rickey, despite your assertions.

    He also believed in looking for power first when looking at a hitter, his Cardinal teams and his Dodger teams NEVER “scratched out runs” tehCardinals during his GM era had the best team OPS, his Dodger squad in teh 40’s were second only to the Cardinals, who were running on the gas that Rickey taught the to aquire.

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About Chad Dotson

Blame Chad for creating this mess. Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, "The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds" is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad's musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine. You can email Chad at chaddotson@redlegnation.com.

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Reds - General