The Enquirer (i.e. John Fay) reviews Narron’s management style:

After five games as Reds manager, Narron has provided some insights into his managerial style.

He’ll play small ball, even early in the game. He had Rich Aurilia sacrifice in the first inning Saturday night. Aurilia got the bunt down and the Reds scored the run, but lost 12-7.

He’s not afraid to use unproven players in tough spots. Brian Shackelford made his big-league debut in a one-run game Sunday.

He wants his players to be conservative on defense early in the game. Third baseman Edwin Encarnacion cut off a ball in the first inning Friday night. The throw might have gotten the runner at the plate.

“Early in the game, you don’t want to give them the extra base,” Narron said. “Sparky Anderson used to preach that. You want to stay out of the big inning early.”

His lineups have been similar to Miley’s. Stats lovers thought Narron’s first move would be flopping Dunn and Sean Casey in the lineup based on Dunn’s superior on-base plus slugging percentage – .956. That hasn’t happened.

Bunting in the first inning on a team giving up over 5 runs a game…that’s a sure sign of genius. It won’t win more games, but it will impress the “old time baseball” people ’cause that’s how the game was played when Leo Cardenas was the Reds shortstop.

About The Author

I've been a Reds fan since the late '60's, with my luck of being able to attend plenty of games at Riverfront during the BRM era. I was sitting in the Green Seats in the OF when Pete came home in '84 and was in the Red seats when Glenn Braggs reached over the fence in '90 to beat the Pirates. I have had many favorites from Jim Maloney to Johnny Bench, Barry Larkin, Adam Dunn, and Jay Bruce.

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One Response

  1. Chris

    Narron just wants to stay out of the big inning early, whether the Reds are on offense or defense.