05/17/2005

Pathetic

I know I said I was going to try to remain upbeat, but I just have to say this: never in my lifetime have I seen a player ground out to second base more than Sean Casey.

Blame Chad for creating this mess.

Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, “The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds” is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad’s musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine.

You can email Chad at chaddotson@redlegnation.com.

Join the conversation! 8 Comments

  1. Who says that isn’t upbeat! You’re saying he’s doing something you never saw anyone else do.

    When he rebounded last year, I sort of decided that he hadn’t been healthy the season(s) before. I now wonder if he’s just not the player we hoped.

  2. It’s the old story of waiting too long to trade Casey for a front-line pitcher and putting Dunn on first where he belongs. The Reds waited too long years ago to trade Eric Davis also.

  3. I was thinking about asking McCoy or one of the other beat writers about this – what’s wrong with Casey’s swing that’s causing all these damn groundouts. Not so much because they’d know, but just to hear the excuse-making. Anyone know where I can find historical info on his GB/FB ratio?

  4. Found something: According to mlb.com, he has a 1.65 GO/AO ratio…which I assume is GroundOut/AirOut. His OPS is 697.

    Prior years:
    1999 1.62 938
    2000 1.42 902
    2001 1.72 827
    2002 1.31 696 (I forgot he’s been this pathetic before – for a whole season)
    2003 1.35 758
    2004 1.20 915

    I can’t really notice any pattern or correlation there.

  5. Well, he did hit some fly balls last season, when he had a decent OPS.

    The 2002 season was the one I was referring to. Problem is, you couldn’t trade him after that, you had to wait for him to get back onto his feet again.

  6. At my first try at math since my freshman year of college, I think I just calculated the correlation between Casey’s GO/AO ratio and his OPS. The sample is so small as to be essentially useless (and I considered each season as equal in weight). In any event, assuming no math errors (unlikely), I came up with 0.38. Especially given the sample size, it’s safe to say that’s insignificant — i.e., there’s no relationship b/w Casey’s GB/FB ratio and his production (OPS).

  7. Hey, no fair using math.

  8. re: Davis and Casey.
    This goes back to what Bill and I were discussing yesterday. It seems the Reds are afraid to trade popular players. Think Oakland’s GM Beane cared if he got a lot of heat for trading Zito and Mulder or how about when Seattle moved Griffey, Johnson and A-Rod over the course of 3 years. Sometimes a club needs to make an unpopular move for the good of the team and if the Red’s front office cannot realize that, then we won’t see much of a winner in this city for quite a while.

Comments are closed.

About Chad Dotson

Blame Chad for creating this mess. Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, "The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds" is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad's musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine. You can email Chad at chaddotson@redlegnation.com.

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Reds - General