Here’s an interesting list from MLB.com about the various ground rules from every Major League ballpark. Here’s an example from Great American Ballpark:

OUTFIELD AREA

Fair ball lodging in fence padding or chain link bullpen “windows”: Two Bases.

This gives me an opportunity to discuss something that I find interesting. When someone hits a ball that bounces into the stands, the announcer or scoreboard will invariably advise everyone that the batter hit a “ground-rule double.”

Well, no, that’s not true, actually. He hit a double, perhaps it could be called a “rule double,” but that situation certainly isn’t a ground-rule double. That’s because the situation is actually listed in the MLB rulebook as a double. It doesn’t have anything to do with the “ground rules.”

Just an issue of semantics, I guess, but it’s something a lot of people may not know.

2 Responses

  1. Chris Eling

    Jon Miller, ESPN broadcaster, makes a point of avoiding the term “ground-rule double” on a bounce-into-the-stands hit due to the fact that it has nothing to do with ground rules. I think he calls it an “automatic double.”

  2. Brian Erts

    Back during the deadball era some parks allowed HR’s on 1 hoppers into the stands. At Redland in the late 20’s there was a pole set on the foul line somewhere between the wall and 1st base. If a ball cleared that poles position in the air it was a HR.

    Redland was a pure #B park and a park where HR’s went to die… lots of @B’s too.