03/01/2005

Crowded outfield

Take a look at this article by Lonnie Wheeler in the Post. Wheeler takes a look at the Reds crowded outfield situation, and concludes that Wily Mo Pena is the odd man out.

I agree, but it didn’t have to be that way. I thought the best option would have been to trade Sean Casey in the offseason for some pitching. Okay, I recognize that such a notion is heresy in parts of Cincinnati, but Casey has been terribly inconsistent over his career, and has been just bad at times. Last year, The Mayor had a superb season, thus his trade value is higher than it likely will ever be again.

(Now, that’s not to say that I dislike Casey. I’m actually a huge Casey fan, and I’ll probably be seen wearing my Casey jersey at Great American Ballpark this season.)

If I were GM, I’d have traded Casey for the best pitcher I could get. Then I’d put Dunn at first base, and I’d have a place to play Wily Mo every day.

Depending on what kind of pitcher you could get in return for Casey, that would definitely have improved the Reds.

Blame Chad for creating this mess.

Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, “The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds” is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad’s musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine.

You can email Chad at chaddotson@redlegnation.com.

Join the conversation! 2 Comments

  1. I agree on trading Casey for pitching, though it may be easier said than done – and, any pitcher worth getting in return is probably going to cost more than Casey. But it’s always the first move I make in SportsMogul or Playstation franchise modes.

  2. Gotta agree with Chad….Casey is a great guy, a great teammate, and a fan favorite…but what will they get you?

    Well,check our record the last few years…the answer’s rather simple.

    If we were a winning team what a true asset he would be…he would be the face of the Reds, and the “common man” would love it.

    However, he’s almost a curse for our team at this point. He’s such a favorite, he’s hard to deal without backlash; he’s just good enough (especially since he does well with the one stat most understand, batting average) that if his replacement did poorly, there would be backlash; and his contract is actually “justified” under current baseball economies.

    However, and possibly bluntly, he’s typically in the bottom third of first basemen when it comes to overall offensive performance, and he’s remarkably inconsistent for a player that does not strike out much.

    Blame it on injuries, if you will, but how many have “called” for dealing other star players whith big contracts, who actually produce more (despite a lower BA) while in the lineup?

    Casey is tradeable, and I think this is Dan O’Brien’s biggest mistake since joining the Reds as GM. The only position easier to fill than 1B is that of relief pitcher…and we have a guy who’s defensive, ‘ahhh,’ talents are screaming for a move to 1B (Dunn). Our best hitting prospect in the minors plays 1B (Votto–2 years away?). We need pitching, Casey is coming off one of his best first halves (his second half was no better than mediocre, one of his career patterns), is likeable, and can be dealt..however, every year it’s going to be harder as he gets older, and his contact goes up.

    The Reds have dealt a popular 1st baseman before…Lee May was our 1971 team MVP (as Casey in 2004) and was the one shining light on that “losing” team and the “Big Bopper” was a fan favorite.

    We dealt him to Houston for Joe Morgan. Yes, that was really the deal at the time for the Reds…in fact, Tommy Helms was popular enough, fans felt it was May AND Helms for a 5-7 2b Joe Morgan and some other stiffs (who turned out to really help…).

    It was a gutsy move by GM Bob Howsam, but the high risk came with high returns based on the needs of the ballclub.

    And, guess what…attedance went up? Why? Because we were WINNING!!

Comments are closed.

About Chad Dotson

Blame Chad for creating this mess. Chad launched Redleg Nation in February 2005, and has been writing about the Reds ever since. His first book, "The Big 50: The Men and Moments That Made the Cincinnati Reds" is now available in bookstores and online, at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and wherever fine books are sold. You can also find Chad's musings about the Cincinnati Reds in the pages of Cincinnati Magazine. You can email Chad at chaddotson@redlegnation.com.

Category

2005 Reds, Reds - General