Game Thread

Indians at Reds (August 7, 2014)

The Reds look for another series victory tonight if they can defeat the Cleveland Indians in the “series” finale. I guess it all depends on whether or not you count this as a 4-game series or separate 2-game series. If you look at it as the latter, then the Reds look to break out the brooms and sweep the Indians following a split in Cleveland.

The juggernaut that is the Reds offense has risen to the occasion the last two games and can not be stopped! Oh yeah, and Homer Bailey takes to the mound with his now solid 3.89 ERA. Let’s see if the Reds can continue closing that gap between themselves and first place in the division.

Discuss the ball game here! Come on you Redlegs!

Lineup:
1. Hamilton CF
2. Bruce RF
3. Frazier 1B
4. Mesoraco C
5. Ludwick LF
6. Negron 2B
7. Santiago 3B
8. Cozart SS
9. Bailey P

173 thoughts on “Indians at Reds (August 7, 2014)

  1. And a Zack Attack on top of it all. Let’s see Homer drive him in … NUTS! They’ll PH for him.

  2. Runner on 3rd, nobody out, and they’re not even close to getting him in. Heisey grounds out on the first pitch, he couldn’t wait a bit, maybe for something he could hit in the air ?

  3. So let me get this straight…. one of the few times in the last month Billy Hamilton is willing to take a borderline pitch is when he has two strikes and a runner on third? I mean, seriously, does anyone teach baseball players ANYTHING about the mental side of the game? To put it nicely: I’ve never seen a team more committed to doing the opposite of what a smart team would do.

    • To be fair, that was an awfully nasty pitch on 3-2; a breaking ball right on the outside corner.

      • Yes, but to be even fairer, the rule of thumb is that you swing at anything close (not just fastballs or pitches down the middle) when you’ve got two strikes, especially when there’s a runner on third and one out. That’s Baseball 101.

    • Hamilton was struck out on a backdoor curve ball, a perfect pitch, looked like a ball until the last instant. That was one of his better recent ABs, in terms of taking vs. swinging.

      • Yes, it was a very good pitch. But a smart major league hitter doesn’t say “well, it was a good pitch, so nothing I could do with it.” A smart major leaguer realizes he’s got to swing at anything that COULD be a strike, even if he’s fooled by it. If he can’t put it in play, he needs to foul it off. But the very worst possible thing to do is to take strike three. ANY contact whatsoever gave him a chance to plate a run. That is one of the few times when it makes sense to swing at a bad pitch, which Hamilton is usually very willing to do when it does NOT make sense. It’s 100% backwards.

      • His error slash pick off was awful. Up 3-0 and popping out. Then he tries to cheat on the throw.

        He cheats all the time and he is probably the one guy who never has to!

    • It is hard to explain but to keep it short IMO when players get paid (cash, adulation, praise) by individual performance and not team performance it becomes “all about me” so situational awareness goes out the window. Many players think if it is good for me then it must be good for the team so what I do must be right.

      • YES! I think that’s a HUGE part of the problem. Teams reward individual stats much more than contributions to team wins. If a guy hits 30 HRs and drives in 100, the team stupidly ignores the fact that he doesn’t understand situational hitting and costs the team several runs by swinging for the fences all the time.

        • if a guy hits 30 HRs and 100 RBIs he probably helped his team win quite a bit already

        • Yes, but not nearly as much as the guy who hits 20 HRs, drives in 85, but also knows how to take a walk, move a runner from second to third, take a pitch to let a guy steal a base, force the opposing pitcher to throw a lot of pitches, run the bases well, etc. But teams are far more likely to offer the big contract to the guy who hits 30 HR than the little guy who forces the pitcher to throw a bunch of extra pitches (tiring the pitcher out so others can hit him better) and drawing walks that force opposing pitchers to throw strikes to the slugger. It’s far more of a team game than people seem to realize.

  4. Not a save situation but I think I’d use Chapman who hasn’t pitched at all in this series. But I didn’t see him warming up.

  5. Indians with 3 errors and at least 3 plays in the field that weren’t caused errors but allowed the Reds an extra base. They are the worst fielding team I’ve seen this year.

    • I saw all of games 2 thru 4. Definitely the worst defense I’ve seen this year, and I can’t recall much worse without going all the way back to the 1962 Mets, one of the worst teams in history.

  6. Johnathan “Big Sequoia” Broxton slams the door shut for the win. Good game, good win for the Reds. Gotta keep it going. Go Reds! Adios Amigos.

    • I still wonder is Walt didn’t force a Broxton trade bc he is a better waivers trade commodity with that contract to unload and the increasingly desperate need for set men and closers in August and Sept.

      • No question in my mind. Walt is laying in the weeds for some team to be unfortunate enough to call about a closer.

  7. Pirates seem to have a safe lead but the Cards are only up 3-2 in the 4th. Go Red Sox!

    At worse, we’ll be 3 GB behind both WC teams and 4 back of the Brewers. 47 games to go!

  8. It’s amazing what great pitching combined with some emotion from the manager to call out players who are not hustling can do. I’ll take the Lou Pinella school of management any day.

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