2013 Reds / Minors

Baseball America’s Top 10 Reds Prospects

From the Enquirer:

1. CF Billy Hamilton: No surprise here. 155 steals. Hit .323/.413/.439 at high A Bakersfield and .286/.406/.383 at Double-A Pensacola. Hamilton was No. 2 on the list last year to Devin Mesoraco.

2. RHP Robert Stephenson: The No. 1 pick in 2011. Touched 100 mph in Dayton last year.

3. LHP Tony Cingrani: Led the minors overall with a 1.73 ERA last year.

4. RHP Daniel Corcino: Johnny Cueto’s look-alike, throw-alike – was 8-8 with a 3.01 ERA in Double-A last year.

5. RHP Nick Travieso: Last year’s No. 1 pick.

6. OF Jesse Winker: He was one of the supplemental picks in last year’s draft. He hit .338/.443/.500 in 228 at-bats at Rookie Billings — very good numbers for a high schooler.

7. J.J. Hoover: Was very impressive in his two stints with the Reds. Went 1-0 with a 2.05 ERA and struck out 31 in 31 innings.

8. LHP Ismael Guillon: 19-year-old from Venezuela. Struck out 100 in 86 innings last year.

9. OF Jonathan Reynosa: Turned 19 yesterday. From the Dominican. Hit .311 and stole league-high 30 bases in the Arizona Summer League.

10. RHP Dan Langfield: Third-rounder last year. Went 3-0 with a 2.68 ERA at Billings.

The accompaning article notes that the Reds are a little thinner as far overall minor league talent. Because of trades and promotions, 12 of the players on last year’s top 30 list don’t qualify for this year’s list.

The only name on this list that I’d expect to see in Cincinnati this season is Hoover, possibly Cingrani (but not if our starters are healthy). But I think there are some good prospects on this list..

89 thoughts on “Baseball America’s Top 10 Reds Prospects

  1. @redsfanman: I agree to the conditions that you have specified. Those include Cueto, Latos, Arroyo, Bailey, Marshall, and Broxton staying healthy and that Chapman must start prior to the opening day starter’s third start for me to win the wager.

    However, I propose that we just wait on the names. If I lose, you can select my name and I will proudly post with it. The only stipulation that I have is that it is (naturally) approved by the moderators. If you lose, I would like to reserve the right to select a name.

    • @redsfanman: I agree to the conditions that you have specified.Those include Cueto, Latos, Arroyo, Bailey, Marshall, and Broxton staying healthy and that Chapman must start prior to the opening day starter’s third start for me to win the wager.

      However, I propose that we just wait on the names.If I lose, you can select my name and I will proudly post with it.The only stipulation that I have is that it is (naturally) approved by the moderators.If you lose, I would like to reserve the right to select a name.

      I propose an arbitrator in the event that there is a disagreement on any purpose of the bet. I propose Chad Dotson. :D

  2. Must admit, I’m rather afraid that idiot may make the final choice to start Chapman in the BP, just like he made the choice to start Stubbs and bat him at or near the top of the lineup all year, as well as to sit Frazier in favor of Rolen in the postseason…there was a lot of talk of “Dusty-proofing” the lineup this winter, but while getting a legit leadoff hitter may help, there are still stupid decisions to be made…

  3. John Fay has an article about how the Reds are reportedly still looking for a left handed reliver.

    Does that punch a few more holes in someone’s “signs”? Or is it all just big conspirational PR lip service?

    (ominous music plays)

    • John Fay has an article about how the Reds are reportedly still looking for a left handed reliver.

      Does that punch a few more holes in someone’s “signs”? Or is it all just big conspirational PR lip service?
      (ominous music plays)

      What the Reds’ front office implies it’s looking for, all that is is PR. We know from experience that specific moves for the Cincinnati Reds are completely unpredictable.

      Nice article about lefty relievers. Interest in a lefty reliever does NOT imply that they’ll find a good one. It mentions Pedro Feliciano, he missed two years with an injury and Jocketty said they haven’t spoken to him. He’s a reclamation project who would have to beat out guys like Arredondo, Ondrusek, Simon, LeCure, and Hoover for a roster spot. Last year Jocketty signed free agent lefties Will Ohman and Ron Mahay to fill out the AAA roster and I expect Jocketty to find minor league lefties of similar caliber rather than guys who will seriously compete for a roster spot.

      The biggest blow to my argument isn’t a quest to find mediocre lefty relievers to send to Louisville, it’s the fact that Chapman is under team control beyond 2014.

      @Drew Mac: You’ve got to include Leake as being healthy as well.

      I included that. Cueto, Latos, Arroyo, Bailey, Leake, Chapman, Marshall, and Broxton all have to stay healthy and in the organization, albeit if at AAA. Injuries to a starter could force Chapman into the rotation while injuries to Marshall or Broxton could force Chapman into the bullpen. Maybe we can come up with the name for the influence of injuries on Chapman’s role, maybe ‘The Madson Factor’.

  4. The last few years the Reds have concentrated more in the June draft on pitching. And it shows in the release of this list. The Reds have drafted a pitcher first in most of the last several drafts and those #1 picks show up highly on this list.
    This June the Reds need to concentrate on position players at the top of the draft. Draft some stud corner OF’s and INF’s in the fisrt few rounds. The Reds have some solid depth up the middle at C, SS, 2B, and CF.

  5. @WVRedlegs: I never understand the logic of drafting for positions. Draft the best available players and go from there. If somebody like Yasmani Grandal or Yonder Alonso is blocked you trade him away. A lot of draft picks (Votto the catcher, Phillips the shortstop, Frazier the shortstop, Billy Hamilton the shortstop, for example) switch positions. Drafting corner outfielders, in particular, is crazy. Almost anybody (maybe not Yonder Alonso, but most guys) who can hit can be moved to a corner outfield spot. If the best player is a pitcher, anybody see how much the Padres got in exchange for Mat Latos?

    The Reds skimmed a whole layer of hitters off the top of their farm system in the past year. Mesoraco, Alonso, Grandal, Cozart, Gregorius, Frazier, and Francisco. The next layer is likely to be pitchers in Cingrani, Corcino, and Hoover (and a hitter in Hamilton). I think that’ll change the organization back from being such a pitching-rich farm system.

    • @WVRedlegs: I never understand the logic of drafting for positions. Draft the best available players and go from there. If somebody like Yasmani Grandal or Yonder Alonso is blocked you trade him away. A lot of draft picks (Votto the catcher, Phillips the shortstop, Frazier the shortstop, Billy Hamilton the shortstop, for example) switch positions. Drafting corner outfielders, in particular, is crazy. Almost anybody (maybe not Yonder Alonso, but most guys) who can hit can be moved to a corner outfield spot. If the best player is a pitcher, anybody see how much the Padres got in exchange for Mat Latos?The Reds skimmed a whole layer of hitters off the top of their farm system in the past year. Mesoraco, Alonso, Grandal, Cozart, Gregorius, Frazier, and Francisco. The next layer is likely to be pitchers in Cingrani, Corcino, and Hoover (and a hitter in Hamilton). I think that’ll change the organization back from being such a pitching-rich farm system.

      There are differing philosophies to the draft, much like in the NFL. Draft the top/best player rated on your board vs. drafting for needs. Also depends on where in the draft you are selecting. Also depends if you have any supplementasl picks at the end of the 1st round.
      I am more of a drafting for needs guy. If the team is rich in pitching and needy at a postion, then why not do what you can to shore up a weakness. And maybe a big weakness at that. The Reds will probably be drafting in the neighborhood of 23rd or 24th. That far down in round one you could get the 2nd or 3rd best power hitting 3rd baseman, for example, in the draft or the 16th or 17th best pitcher. Its up to who is drafting. The Reds and WJ and his staff I believe combine the two philosophies together and have produced very good drafts.

  6. @steveschoen: Factors besides his performance in spring training resulted in his return to the rotation in 2012 and I similarly believe that his spring performance is irrelevant. Broxton was brought in to strengthen the bullpen in 2012 and I expect he’ll return to that same role in 2013. They definitely could have replaced him with a cheaper/discount option, maybe Logan Ondrusek, but the whole point of acquiring Broxton was acquiring a good setupman.

    Lots of specific points. Lots of things going on at once. Maybe you disagree with some points. Examine the whole picture. They’ve brought the same pitching staff back intact, including their 5 starters who combined for 161 starts and their dominant Nasty Boys-esque bullpen that they worked so hard to build.

    @WVRedlegs: I guess I’m a ‘draft for talent’ guy – draft picks are always a risk and usually take years and years to pay off. The Reds have made a wide variety of picks in recent years, switching between high schoolers and college students, pitchers and hitters. I was surprised when Stephenson and Travieso were taken out of high school.

    Don’t the Reds have the 29th pick after finishing second in MLB in wins? Things are pretty well picked over by then.

    • @steveschoen: Factors besides his performance in spring training resulted in his return to the rotation in 2012 and I similarly believe that his spring performance is irrelevant.Broxton was brought in to strengthen the bullpen in 2012 and I expect he’ll return to that same role in 2013.They definitely could have replaced him with a cheaper/discount option, maybe Logan Ondrusek, but the whole point of acquiring Broxton was acquiring a good setupman.

      Wrong. They acquired him to be a closer, as evidenced by the fact that Jocketty signed him to a contract and said he signed him to close. You can keep denying this fact, but it doesn’t make it not true.

      Jocketty makes moves with an eye on the future. Getting Broxton to close so Chapman could move to the rotation was one of those moves. He also got Marshall and Madson the previous season with the idea both could be potential closers. Don’t you get it yet? JOCKETTY DOES NOT WANT CHAPMAN TO BE THE CLOSER, he wants him in the rotation, which is what he originally signed him for.

      How ’bout them signs?

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