2013 Reds

Price to stay with Reds as pitching coach

As was reported a few days ago, Reds pitching coach Bryan Price interviewed with the Miami Marlins for their managerial job. Today, Mark Sheldon reports that Price is no longer in the running for that job and will remain with the Reds.

Reds pitching coach Bryan Price has withdrawn his name from consideration for the Marlins manager’s job, a person familiar with the situation said on Tuesday. Price interviewed with Miami on Friday. He will remain on the Reds coaching staff.

Clearly, while Price surely deserves his shot to manage a big league club, this is great news for the Reds. Maybe, as Chad suggested here last week, Price will be the next Reds manager after Dusty Baker.

8 thoughts on “Price to stay with Reds as pitching coach

  1. It’s worth recognizing that pitchers don’t become managers very often. Is there even an active MLB manager who was a pitcher? There are lots of former catchers or former hitting coaches.

    Also being a good pitching coach doesn’t necessarily open doors to become a manager – Dave Duncan (a former catcher) was a reputable pitching coach from 1979-2011 and never got a managerial job.

    Got a problem with Dusty Baker’s lineup and choice of pinch hitters? I don’t think a pitching expert like Bryan Price is the solution. I think Price is a great pitching coach and that he belongs in that role, working with pitchers.

  2. John Farrel, now of the Red Sox, is the only one that I can think of. That certainly doesn’t mean there isn’t more.

  3. Bud Black . . . Also, past pitchers who translated into solid managers include Lasorda, Bob Lemon, Hutchinson, Roger Craig, and (I believe) Dallas Green.

  4. Somehow I think it often gets lost that there is nobody better than a pitching coach to tell hitters how to read a pitcher and nobody better than a hitting coach to tell pitchers how to read batters because pitching coaches study pitchers (their own) and hitting coaches likewise.

    Over the course of the year on the TV broadcast, I picked up a number of times than Jacoby and Price were having conversations where this type of info seemed to be going back and forth…

    I think the one generalization about who does and doesn’t make good manager material as group is that guys who were naturally good uber talented MLB players seem to struggle communicating with rank and file type MLB level talent.

    • As a followup, Tommy Lasorda pitched 45 career innings with a 6.48 ERA and Bryan Price wasn’t talented enough to reach MLB. Bud Black and John Farrell put together reasonably successful pitching careers. Still, it’s just interesting how so few pitchers become managers.

      Somehow I think it often gets lost that there is nobody better than a pitching coach to tell hitters how to read a pitcher and nobody better than a hitting coach to tell pitchers how to read batters because pitching coaches study pitchers (their own) and hitting coaches likewise.

      Over the course of the year on the TV broadcast, I picked up a number of times than Jacoby and Price were having conversations where this type of info seemed to be going back and forth…

      I think the one generalization about who does and doesn’t make good manager material as group is that guys who were naturally good uber talented MLB players seem to struggle communicating with rank and file type MLB level talent.

      I never noticed any trouble being expressed between Jacoby and Price. I don’t think the Reds ban the hitters from speaking to Bryan Price. Maybe he can offer advice to help the hitters – you know, like a coach on a coaching staff. At the same time, it must be distracting (especially for young players) to have different people handing you opposing plans and approaches to follow, and I think that’s something they’ve tried to avoid.

      Drew Stubbs, for example, needs to change every which way depending on who you ask – make contact more often, don’t swing as much, be more aggressive, be less agressive, bunt more, use the homerun power, hit it on the ground, steal more bases but don’t risk getting caught stealing. After this kinda season he must be getting different approaches from everyone he talks to.

  5. And for anyone who didnt already hear about the Reds getting snubbed in the Gold Glove categories, let me fill you in. No one of the six Reds nominated received the award. Obviously, not all were deserving but we certainly had some strong candidates. Brandon Phillips for one was outstanding as usual and though he did not have the stats to stand up to Barney (considering his long errorless streak this year), anyone who watched Phillips and the amazing Gold Glove caliber plays he made every week like it was nothing should have received the award IMO. And yes, I know I am swayed because I am a Reds fan, but still. Another major upset was the shortstop winner, Jimmy Rollins. Yes, let me repeat that, JIMMY ROLLINS. Really? We all know Zach Cozart is a rookie and made a few bonehead plays here and there, especially a crucial one against the Giants in the NLDS, but to give Rollins the award this year is merely just giving the award to a known name. The award should be based on present performance, not the past. And based on this year, Cozart deserved the award more. But then again so did other shortstops.

  6. @MrRedlegs3900: I didn’t care much about Cozart missing out. I didn’t like Rollins as the choice but I don’t feel like Cozart got snubbed either. It’s unusual for a rookie to win a Gold Glove and he’s not the only guy who was overlooked – the ESPN broadcasters seemed surprised that Mike Trout didn’t win a Gold Glove. It also seemed like Brandon Crawford might be a candidate.

    Brandon Phillips came to the Reds in 2006 but won his first Gold Glove in 2008, when he was 27. Scott Rolen made his debut in 1996, won the Rookie of the Year in 1997, but didn’t win his first Gold Glove until 1998. If Cozart keeps up his current level of fielding and doesn’t win a Gold Glove in 2013 I’ll be angry, but I’m not yet.

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