2012 Post-season / Editorials / Reds - General

Major League disappointment

Raise your hand if you’d spend $310 for a ticket to see a baseball game.

On Saturday, I received the letter from the Reds that explained my options for purchasing postseason tickets. As a season ticket holder, my opportunity to buy NLDS, NLCS and World Series tickets is this weekend, from Friday through Monday. Tickets for individual games are not available, you have to buy a “series strip.”

My regular season seat is in Infield Box section 130 and costs $32/game. The letter informed me that a similar seat for the NLDS will cost $78 and for the NLCS, $105 – more than three times my regular price. That’s pretty steep. It would be nice to have the chance of purchasing a ticket for one game or two. That’s not an option.

Assuming its available, my seat costs $732 for the NLDS and NLCS (including the mandatory purchase of a ticket to the highly improbable Wild Card game). No option to buy tickets for only the NLDS or only the NLCS. If you want to attend even one game, you’re required to purchase tickets for all eight.

Is it really so hard or complicated to sell individual tickets for playoff games that fans have to be treated this way?

That brings me to the World Series.

As a teenager, I attended the 1972, 1975 and 1976 World Series, one game per series. Still have the ticket stubs. I was there for Ed Armbrister’s bunt.

A 2012 World Series ticket for my regular season seat costs $310 – per game. You read that right. Nearly ten times the regular season price. That’s the cost for the Infield and Field Boxes. Again, the sole option is to buy a series strip for all four games. Price: $1,240 for one seat.

Of course, the option of purchasing a worse seat is available. The few bleacher seats are $95/game. Other than that the cheapest seats cost $155/game. Some of the upper deck seats cost $240/game. You do get your money back if games aren’t played, like if the Reds don’t play in the Wild Card game. But the refund takes up to four weeks. When you add the lead time, the Reds could end up holding thousands of dollars of my money for nearly two months.

I know I’m fortunate. I have the means and proximity to enjoy a regular season Reds ticket at a reasonable price. And a great, great seat at that. I’m grateful to have the opportunity to buy postseason tickets. This post really isn’t about me (although it probably sounds like it so far) it’s about the way this arrangement treats the average fan.

The Reds’ representative I spoke with Tuesday (and since confirmed by someone definitely in the know) said the prices and policies were set by Major League Baseball, not the Reds. And I believe that. The Reds wouldn’t do this to their fans. It creates the ill will they work so hard year-round to avoid. The Reds would want their average, everyday fans to attend their team’s World Series. They would want the same people who show up to cheer for the team all year to be there for their crowning achievement. They’d want kids to treasure their 2012 World Series ticket stubs and memories of sacrifice bunts into adulthood. (Hey! Buy a season ticket package and you’ll have the opportunity to spend nearly $2,000 more for postseason tickets!) This is bad for their business in the long term.

It’s something the Bengals would do.

I thought about this situation Tuesday night at GABP. The crowd was really into it the entire game. Each Mat Latos escape. Jay Bruce’s game winning home run. Aroldis Chapman’s strikeouts. I noticed the elation and joy of the couples, the friends, the die-hards, the kids, the families — average Reds fans, supporting their team. And it occurred to me that few of us would attend the World Series.

I’m sure some smart economist in the Commissioner’s office has figured out they can sell thousands of $310 tickets for the World Series, in this economy, in the Cincinnati area. It just wont be to many average Reds fans. Or to me.

And that’s a Major League disappointment.

53 thoughts on “Major League disappointment

    • @TC:

      All joking aside. I have to agree. But Bud Selig has never been accused of being a good commissioner.

      Bud “the Dud” Selig. This sounds like something that would come from that jackass’s office. The average Joe fan just cannot catch a break. He is priced out of the good stuff every time.

  1. Attending baseball games at Yankee Stadium has become an event for VIPs, not for baseball fans. And it seems the disease is spreading.

    People talk about how great Bud Selig has done as a commisoner. His “success” has been based on one thing: total focus on the bottom line. Which is how it goes I guess, but when he talks about the “integrity of the game”: it makes me want to vomit.

    • I attended game 1 of the ’73 Playoffs, sat in the yellow seats in LF, 2-1 win on home in bottom of 9th by Bench, after homer in 8th by Rose. I was 15 at the time.

      Sorry, lost my point…the point I was going to make was I was 15 and sent in and got my ticket with my own money, etc, which shows you how affordable it was at the time.

  2. Well said .. I am retired and have the 20 game infield seat package as you do. Its $800 . Thats a lot . I love baseball ,the Reds and really enjoy being there with “kindred spirited” fans. So I am willing to spend to stretch the budget for that entertainment. But that is as far as I will go. Look at it this way. None of the folks you enjoy the games with will be there for the post season anyway . How about we all hook up at a local bar and support our team in the post season ? I can show you my 75 & 76 World Series tickets too. I was at Game #5 in 75(Tony’s two homer game and at game #2 in 76 .. maybe the coldest game I have ever attended , won by the Reds .. vs Catfish Hunter. I’m sure our Kids will remember the bar we were at for this year’s games .. MLB is the long term loser here.

  3. Ticket prices for practically everything are pretty unbelievable. I live ~4 hours from the nearest MLB teams (6 of them) so it’s hard for me to judge, my only point of references is Iowa football.

    I pay about $800 a year for a pair of seats. That’s 7 games @ about $55 apiece. Last year I tried to get 4 tickets so I could bring a couple friends to a few games and probably end up selling the rest.

    I go to Chicago once a year and watch the Reds. Last year I went in August, when both teams were out of the race, for a Thursday day game. I looked on Stubhub and ebay and couldn’t find any deals, and the best thing I ended up with was one of the worst seats I’ve ever had in my life for $60. On a Thursday! I had a hotdog and rode the subway to get there, so tack on another $20.

    I make a pretty decent living and I’m responsible with my money, but there’s no way I could see doing that on any sort of a regular basis.

  4. I’m assuming non-season ticket holders who win the lottery can buy single-game tickets? Because there’s no chance I’m driving to Cincinnati from Columbus two or three times in a week.

    That said, I would consider paying $310 to attend one World Series game. That could be a once-in-a-lifetime chance.

    When I was in college in 1995, I went to Game 3 of the NLDS at Riverfront. It was spur of the moment… we bought tickets at the box office just a couple of hours before the game. I don’t remember how much they cost, but they couldn’t have been more than $20 or $30, or I wouldn’t have been able to afford them.

    • I’m assuming non-season ticket holders who win the lottery can buy single-game tickets?Because there’s no chance I’m driving to Cincinnati from Columbus two or three times in a week.

      That said, I would consider paying $310 to attend one World Series game.That could be a once-in-a-lifetime chance.

      When I was in college in 1995, I went to Game 3 of the NLDS at Riverfront.It was spur of the moment… we bought tickets at the box office just a couple of hours before the game.I don’t remember how much they cost, but they couldn’t have been more than $20 or $30, or I wouldn’t have been able to afford them.

      You are allowed to buy single game tickets if you win the lottery. My friend was fortunate enough to be selected back in 2010.

      I hear you Steve with this problem. I go to as many Reds games as I can afford, but I just graduated college and I am paying back student loans, it would be rough to foot that kind of bill. The thing is, I may not even get a chance to get tickets to a game unless I am selected by the random drawing. At the very least, you have the opportunity to purchase tickets in the event you want to go. I definitely sympathize with you being forced to buy tickets to the whole series tho. This is the kind of crap that causes Reds fans to be forced to sell their extras that they are forced to buy, often to visiting fans or scalpers or something. Very infuriating. I would not be allowed to say the things I want to about Bud Selig on this blog.

      That said, a world series game would be something I would pay for, because chances like that don’t come around often. I just have to hope I am selected.

  5. The sad, cold, hard truth is that it’s always about the big company (Or MLB in this situation) making huge amounts of money with no consideration your average person. What a shame and a crock for all the faithful season ticket holders.

  6. As a pre-teen, I attended the 1990 NLCS (2 games) with my father. We had ‘yellow’ seats which were out of our usual red seat purchasing domain. However, the tickets were not inordinately higher than the regular season cost even then.

  7. I think ticket prices to all games are ridiculous, but it’s MLB’s unbelievable broadcast strategy that has me wishing I could stop watching baseball all together.

    Since we’re in the “local market” for Chicago, St Louis, Milwaukee, Kansas City and Minneapolis (that’s 6 cities whose local channels we don’t get), all these games are blacked out. It’s literally impossible for me to watch nearly half of all baseball games legally.

    For the remainder, MLB wants me to pay $30 a month for a low quality stream.
    That’s more than I pay for all the ESPN channels, NFL Network, Big Ten Network and 2 dozen other sports channels. Don’t get me started on the ADDITIONAL charge for HD. Name anyone else that thinks they could get away with that. And Extra Innings costs so much that I’ve completely blocked the number from my memory.

    You know why football is more popular than baseball? It’s accessible. The NFL has it’s share of wrinkles in it’s broadcasting rules, but in general they want you to watch games. You know what sport doesn’t do that? Boxing. And it’s made boxing about as relevant as badminton. Which path should MLB choose?

  8. I’ve already got my plane tickets booked to fly home for Game 2 of the World Series and fully expect to pay upwards of $400 for a ticket…if you decide to pull the trigger I’d gladly offer you more than what you paid. Maybe it’s because you got to see the Big Red Machine win the World Series in person, but this is the first legitimate chance the Reds have had at a World Championship since I was in preschool. Nothing’s cheap these days, and there’s no way to put a price tag on this experience. I plan on using my work bonus to pay for a ticket, and my flight has been booked since we rattled off 15 of 16. Gas was 97 cents a gallon when I first started driving, and I paid $4.29 yesterday. I understand it’s a business and I’m probably furthering your frustration by this post, but there is no single event that could ever take place that I’d be willing to pay more for than a Reds World Series game.

  9. @SoCalRedsFan: Doesn’t bother me. I’m excited to hear there are die-hard Reds fans who will be there. I get it that if you’re coming from far away, the one-time expense isn’t as out of place. Kind of ironic that maybe the people who are in worse shape are those already spending money to attend a bunch of regular season games. Interesting. I don’t think I’ll have any unspoken-for World Series tickets, though.

  10. @SoCalRedsFan: That’s so true. I’ve already warned my wife that there might be some suspicious charges on our credit card this October.

    Steve’s point is spot-on, though. The fans are giving this giant corporation a zero interest loan for months. That’s garbage.

  11. @Steve Mancuso: This may be a little bit off topic, but hopefully not too much. Outside of postseason play, has RLN ever considered a RLN night at GABP? Not really a night per say but rather a group outing? I don’t know how much interest would be out there, but I know I would be interested in interacting personally for a night at the ballpark with those who we chastise, admonish, acknowledge, compliment, commiserate with, rant with, cheer with and overall spend countless hours with over the course of a season.

    • In my opinion if somebody doesn’t want to pay for ticket prices they don’t have to go to the game.

      @Steve Mancuso: This may be a little bit off topic, but hopefully not too much.Outside of postseason play, has RLN ever considered a RLN night at GABP?Not really a night per say but rather a group outing?I don’t know how much interest would be out there, but I know I would be interested in interacting personally for a night at the ballpark with those who we chastise, admonish, acknowledge, compliment, commiserate with, rant with, cheer with and overall spend countless hours with over the course of a season.

      I’d be worried that somebody would try to hurt me for cheering for Drew Stubbs or Dusty Baker. I’d be interested if there was an assurance of no violence.

    • @Steve Mancuso: This may be a little bit off topic, but hopefully not too much.Outside of postseason play, has RLN ever considered a RLN night at GABP?Not really a night per say but rather a group outing?I don’t know how much interest would be out there, but I know I would be interested in interacting personally for a night at the ballpark with those who we chastise, admonish, acknowledge, compliment, commiserate with, rant with, cheer with and overall spend countless hours with over the course of a season.

      We did one 2-3 years ago, everyone seemed to have a good time..and I believe they won.

  12. That’s really terrible, Steve. It’s shameful (and borderline unbelievable) that they won’t offer you the opportunity to buy tickets to a single game. This policy seems designed to minimize the number of season ticket holders who buy discounted (are they discounted?) tickets.

    I’m in the same boat as SoCal. I can’t go to the games regularly, but will make the trip down from Michigan for a playoff game if my number gets drawn. I was at the Halladay no-hitter (I lived in Philly at the time), and I need to wash that taste out of my mouth.

    As someone suggested above, though, it was not the usual Philly crowd at the no-hitter. After a few years of going to see the Reds at CBP, I had gotten used to being hastled for my Reds shirt (usually in a good-natured-ish way), but during the playoff game no one really paid any attention to me. This sounds like a good thing, but it’s not really.

  13. Seems like they’re basing everything on what the New York market will bear. Dubious idea, if you ask me.

  14. I agree this is a bad policy, at least as it pertains to the average fan.

    But all I hear are complaints, not solutions. I once stood in line overnight to buy Cardinals playoff tickets (I went to college in St. Louis, not a Cards fan) for a ticket vendor. They gave me an envelope with cash right in front of the window, then ushered me to a hotel room where I was paid for my efforts. I didn’t see any guns, but I’m sure they were there and I might as well have been dealing drugs, lol.

    Anyway, if you have the cash (as it sounds like you do, Steve), pony up, dummies! You’ll more than recoup the value in the secondary market (stubhub, ebay, etc.). Or do a version of what I did – get someone with the money to offer to pay in the same way, then offer to “buy back” a game or two at face value. They can resell the rest for a profit, minus your one or two games.

    As with any tradable commodity, if there is a nearly-unlimited, liquid secondary market (maybe there is a limited demand for the NLDS, but I’m pretty sure a Nats/Reds NLCS would be a hot ticket for anyone) that places higher value on the commodity than you are required to pay, the only two issues to consider are how much to buy and where to obtain financing.

    I hope everyone in Red Leg Nation is able to find such an arrangement. Me, I’m rooting like hell for the Yankees to make the Series so I can buy a ticket here in NY and watch the game 4 stops away.

    • But all I hear are complaints, not solutions.

      Charge the same amount for World Series tickets as the NLCS. Allow season ticket holders to buy individual game seats. Thought I implied those strongly enough.

      You sort of missed my point, which wasn’t whether or not I’d be able to afford or financially take advantage of the situation. It was that the average fan who attends regular season games is squeezed out of attending the World Series.

  15. First, this is exactly how the NFL handles it: You buy tickets for every possible playoff game, and the NFL sets the prices. When the Colts made the playoffs regularly, I would re-sell some of my tickets for a profit to help pay for tickets I actually used.

    Second, there’s really no reason to complain about the ticket prices unless a playoff game ends up not being sold out. MLB is not a charity, so it makes perfect sense for them to set ticket prices at a level that meets demand.

    And as for having to buy tickets to every potential game, think of it as the price you pay for the privilege of a guaranteed ticket to a high-demand event. If that privilege is too expensive, join the rest of us in the lottery — and don’t get mad if you don’t get selected.

    • Second, there’s really no reason to complain about the ticket prices unless a playoff game ends up not being sold out. MLB is not a charity, so it makes perfect sense for them to set ticket prices at a level that meets demand.

      The fact that there might be enough wealthy people who can clear the market at $310/ticket or more entirely misses my point. Like I said in the post, I’m sure they’ve hired someone fancy enough to figure out what the market can bear. That maximizes profits in the short term, at least.

      My point was that the average fan who supports the team in person gets priced out.

      I don’t think the Castellini family is trying to maximize their profits, by the way. Not that they want to take a loss. I may be naive, but I sincerely feel they view the team at least partly as a civic trust. No way if they got to set the price/policy for this game that the ticket prices would be what they are.

      And I’m not sure gouging for the WS like this does boost the Reds profits in the long run. Maybe the Commissioner’s office makes enough money to pay Selig’s obscene salary ($17 million, last I saw) off of this. But if the high prices create ill will, or reducing the incentive for people like me to buy season tickets because the postseason perk isn’t as valuable, the pricing structure may be counterproductive for the local organization over the medium term.

      • My point was that the average fan who supports the team in person gets priced out.

        But if ticket prices were lower, you would still have the same number of people in the stadium and left out of the stadium! It’s not like tickets at half the price would allow another 40,000 people into GABP.

        The great thing is that everybody will still be able to watch the game on FREE TV.

  16. In 90 my buddy spent almost all day on the phone trying to get NLCS tickets, he was able to het two seats and had to buy for all four games…total cost was $200 or $25 per game for each seat, we were in upper deck so high we couldn’t see Braggs make the game saving catch in game six, but thought the ticket prices were at least fair…now they want $40 for the bleachers…

  17. Wow. Several thoughts here.
    First, I think those of you suggesting that this is a money making opportunity are completely missing the point. Steve COULD do that, but then he’s guilty of the same crass greed as MLB. The point is that these policies are a crummy “reward” for being a loyal, season ticket holding fan and it is unfortunate that the Reds (who I seriously doubt would have set things up this way if they had a choice) come out looking greedy too. I know Bob Castellini a little bit and I am certain that support of individual Reds fans does matter to him and this organization beyond just the support we provide with our wallets.
    Second, I will be there if I can. It’s a long drive from Atlanta but I’ve never seen a Reds series game. I made it to game 1 of the playoffs in 1990 against the Pirates, and paid a boatload to be there when GABP opened in 2003, but I’ve been waiting a long time to see the Reds in a World Series game in Cincinnati. I suppose there’s a limit to what I’d pay for a ticket, but for one game I agree that $310 would be fine. But Steve is absolutely right that the “splurge from a long way away” makes sense for me while “pony up for the whole strip” is a lot to expect of season ticket holders. I’m in the lottery and we’ll be on StubHub and shaking trees in Ohio by phone, whatever it takes to find a couple tickets I can afford. But for what it’s worth Steve, I would MUCH rather be able to see 60 or 70 games in person throughout the season than one world series game, so I’m jealous. I watch 120+ games a year on TV, and MLB Extra Innings is a small miracle for those of us who live a long way out, but it’s not the same as being at the ballpark.
    Third and finally, I’m thrilled that we’re even having this conversation. I think that sometimes our enthusiasm for the game and our favorite team gets tainted a little by all the bickering about lineups and roster moves and managerial qualifications and the like. Let me remind everyone that what we’re talking about here is this: How can we get affordable tickets for NLDS, NLCS, and World Series games to see the Reds in the post season? That my fellow Reds fanatics is an exciting question to be having to ask. Enjoy this – it’s what we all hope for and dream about, starting every spring.

    • First, I think those of you suggesting that this is a money making opportunity are completely missing the point.Steve COULD do that, but then he’s guilty of the same crass greed as MLB.

      First, “greed” is the most overused buzzword of the current decade.

      Second, he could re-sell extra tickets at face value or less if he wanted to. I GUARANTEE there would be a market for it…

  18. By the way, I love this blog and everything is well-written and well thought out.
    That said . . . I do sympathize with the “sticker shock”. But, I am from the NY area, and those prices are comparable to REGULAR-season Yankees and Mets games. I paid $110 per seat to sit past first base for the Mets this season (yes, when the Reds were in town!), and I have paid more for Yankee tickets. I sat in $800 Yankee seats against the Reds in May (seats were given to me from corporate tickets). It stinks.
    It actually makes me sad that the Reds draw so poorly – to me, the tickets are such a steal. I flew into Cincy for a 3-game series last year, and I am coming back again for the last home stand this season. My favorite part of booking the trip – buying the tickets. They are just so cheap! I am paying LESS for great seats than I did in Yankee Stadium in 1996 – I think that is the year that the better seats went up to $50. It’s all supply and demand (I also have an Economics background, so I can’t complain about ticket prices. I actually used to teach it as an example.)
    I do agree, though, that you should be able to buy for individual games. I would definitely have a problem with that.
    But . . . look at it this way . . . having to think about affording playoff seats is a great problem! I’ll be happily watching from my house in NJ.
    (sorry if this was too babbly, I did actually like this post)

    • My issue is lack of being able to buy individual tickets.

      Exactly. Giving season ticket holders the opportunity to buy tickets to a single game at regular price would seem like the decent think to do.

  19. I don’t want to sound harsh, but honestly, I see nothing wrong with MLB upcharging the price of playoff and World Series tickets. It’s a matter of simple supply and demand. In 2011, MLB drew 73,425,568 fans over the course of 2,430 regular season games. Obviously, that’s the number of tickets sold, not the total number of different individuals attending a game. Still, when you consider that there are only 43 possible playoff games, it is pretty easy to see that millions upon millions of people are competing against each other for the same seat. If you are MLB, why not do it?

    Here’s what you do as a fan… buy the tickets. If you only want to go to a game, find some friends to split the tickets or sell the games you don’t want on Craigslist.

    • @David:

      Here’s what you do as a fan… buy the tickets. If you only want to go to a game, find some friends to split the tickets or sell the games you don’t want on Craigslist.

      There are a LOT of Reds fans, even season ticket holders (TY Big Bob for the many economic options the Reds make available), who simply CAN NOT afford the lump sum cost of the entire strip of post season tickets. These are the diehard fans, the fans who commit their VERY limited entertainment $$$ on their beloved Reds. These are the Reds’ fans who pass on their devotion to their children and grandchildren. They could afford a cash outlay for a single postseason game. They would relish and cherish that experience, but simple family economics will not allow such a large cash expenditure, even if it was recovered later. The $$$ is simply not there in the monthly budget. The lottery offers their lone chance of enjoying the experience. Good luck to those true fans. I hope you each get the opportunity of a lifetime.

    • I don’t want to sound harsh, but honestly, I see nothing wrong with MLB upcharging the price of playoff and World Series tickets.It’s a matter of simple supply and demand.In 2011, MLB drew 73,425,568 fans over the course of 2,430 regular season games.Obviously, that’s the number of tickets sold, not the total number of different individuals attending a game.Still, when you consider that there are only 43 possible playoff games, it is pretty easy to see that millions upon millions of people are competing against each other for the same seat.If you are MLB, why not do it?

      Here’s what you do as a fan… buy the tickets.If you only want to go to a game, find some friends to split the tickets or sell the games you don’t want on Craigslist.

      What if you don’t have $120 laying around? I can afford $40, but no chance of $120 for the NLDS.

  20. have an opportunity to get 2 tix to 1 LDS game, 1 LCS game & 1 WS game for $650…..still a little too steep for me & am gonna keep my fingers crossed for the lottery

  21. @David: The point of the article is it makes a lot more sense for the ticket office to sell me a ticket, you a ticket and Uncle Fred a ticket instead of selling them all to me and then reselling them. The reason must surely be that they only have to pay their staff to deal with tickets once, but they do it at the expense of alienating fans.

    From my point of view, the people on this site don’t live in the same sports reality I do. Around here baseball is almost completely dead. None (NONE!) of my friends’ kids play baseball. There are 2 (2!) people I actually know that I can talk about baseball with. There is a small handful of people that will go to a Cubs game if they’re in Chicago for some other reason. Other than at games, I’ve met 2 Reds fans in my LIFE. Tell anyone around here that baseball is America’s pasttime and they’ll laugh at you. Go to one of our Low-A Angels games and you can hang out with 800 friends. The semi-pro football and hockey teams in town, for comparison, regularly sell out their 5000 seats.

    I really think MLB’s biggest concern should be winning back fans, not milking the remainder for everything they can get.

  22. @BloodyHo: If you split the tickets with others, you could get their money up front to help make the large payment.

    Of course, the thinking from MLB could be that if they can afford the lump sum for regular-season tickets, they would probably be able to afford the lump sum for postseason tickets.

  23. @Jared: Well, it’s a good thing you don’t run the team.

    The average ticket price for a regular season game is $20.56. A Reds sell out can draw up to 44,599, which happened for game 3 of the NLDS in 2010. That means for a regular season sell out, the Reds can take in as much as $916,955.44. For a playoff game, it’s even more than that.

    The Reds will sell out Game 5 of the NLDS well in advance of the game, which is scheduled on either Oct. 11-12. Let’s assume the Reds collect and hold $916,955.44 as early as Oct. 1. What do the Reds do with all that money? The Reds probably invest the draw into a relatively modest interest bearing account. 5.5% is not unreasonable.

    On $916,955.44 at 5.5%, the Reds are making $138.17 per day. Let’s say a reasonable time frame in which you can expect to see a refund if Game 5 doesn’t happen is 60 – 90 days. There are 101 days between Oct. 1 (when the Reds deposited the take) to January 10 (90 days after Oct. 12). 101 x $138.17 = $14,008.70. Do this for all of the future games, and the Reds make a nice little profit even on games which never happen.

    As for fans going away – 2011 saw the 5th highest attendance in MLB history, doing better than 2009 and 2010.

  24. AAA baseball preseason sale of 8 seat coupon pack cost $78 I could use them for any game and any available seat. I could buy other coupon packs during the season for the preseason price. One game your close up talking to Corky Miller then the next game you pick a Bob Uecker seat. In a 11,000 seat stadium there isn’t a bad seat in the house.

  25. I had hoped to attend at least one playoff game, but I’m not sure I will after reading his. This from the same people who brought us the 1994 World Series. Obviously baseball is doing this because they think they can. They’d best be careful however as after college football’s opening weekend I read a number of stories at how attendance was off at a number of big time schools that couldn’t sell out their opener. Schools not selling out included Florida, Stanford, Ole Miss, Illinois, and Penn State. Ohio State may or may not have been a sellout, but looking at the crowd there were obviously a few thousand empty seats. My point is that there is only so much money out there and if you take your best customers for granted by forcing them to buy more and more crap in order to get what they really want it will eventually catch up with you. Joe Buckeye doesn’t get bent out of shape for paying $75 (or much more) for an OSU-Michigan ticket, but he starts to when you force him to pay $75 each for games against the likes of Akron, Youngstown State, Eastern Michigan, etc for the right to buy the game you really want. There is a tipping point, but the I doubt that Allan H. Selig, the former used car salesman from Milwaukee gets it.

  26. @renbutler: Only those stupid enough to be held up through the mail. It would seem to me to make more business sense for baseball to sell the tickets stand-alone so that they would attract more people. That would in turn help expand their hardcore fan base by giving more people a chance to see something great.

  27. My father and I have had season tickets since 1980 something. We have bought the playoff package for our seats and received them the other day. I really hate to say how much it was because its sickening and stupid but well worth it. Were in section 124 so just know that there aren’t corporate non fans behind home plate. There are diehard, lifelong Red legs too.

  28. Local Reds fans have no idea how lucky they are. I’m a So Cal Reds fan and I pay $150-$220 a seat to watch the Redlegs play the Dodgers during the regular season. FYI, only fans with the $200 plus seats are allowed to try to get autographs at Dodger stadium. At Petco Park I can usually find great seats for around $100 on Stubhub. GABP is one of the least expensive ballparks. Be grateful.

  29. To those from California or New York who are saying how much more tickets are there – isn’t the cost of living higher in those places? Therefore, aren’t salaries higher? We put our name in the lottery for playoff tickets and if chosen will pay the higher ticket price, but if normal ticket prices were as high as some of you mention I would rarely attend a game. As it is we go to 8 – 10 games a year. The only time we sit on the field level is when they have the Reds Win, You Win promotion with reduced ticket prices. Usually we are in the upper level. I guess if we are chosen in the lottery we will see how much World Series tickets are. I went to a game in the ’75 series. Also, a playoff game in 1990. I would love for my son to be able to say someday that he was at the 2012 World Series.

    I think most fans realize that these high (for Cincinnati) ticket prices are not determined by Bob Castellini or the Reds organization. Castellini has done a great job of winning over the fans.

  30. I think MLB has dropped the ball sort of speak with fans on these ticket prices for the playoffs. I have a family of 5 so ball games out for us are not cheap. However we go to several games each yr. The REDS do a great job with giveaways, ticket prices overall, concessions and they even let you brink in drinks, snacks to the game for goodness sake so I never complain about GABP. It is IMO the best fan friendly ball park in MLB. I can undersatnd this is a buisness and about making money but these tickets are WAY over priced. Make it affordable to the average fan everywhere. $90 bucks for a Kroger bleacher is a joke. I love my REDS but like most of us i will be at home in my recliner
    (not bleacher seating) with a nice meal (hopefully $10 pizza) watching it on my big screen LED in full HD w/ surround sound while also listening to 790 awaiting Marty B to say this World Series belongs to the :P REDS!!!!!!

  31. Making the tickets cheaper will simply drive up demand. And it certainly won’t increase supply.

    We’d still have only a small percentage of ticket seekers with access to tickets — and the MLB and team wouldn’t make as much money.

  32. @Jared: Jared .. where do you live ? .. and let me suggest you find some new friends .. Seriously I know the game has really slipped in popularity over several decades now. But move to Louisville, look me up and we can go watch the Bats . At least they outdraw arena football here in town. And U of L has a great college Baseball program here. Its basketball country here to be sure, but there are still a ton of Baseball nuts here too.

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